We're through creative a branding and digital agency from Macclesfield near Manchester. We've put together this site to create a source of inspiration, we hope you like it.

Neil Blumenthal: 3 Lessons Learned From Building Warby Parker

Posted: April 18th, 2014 | Author: behanceteam | Filed under: Innovation | Comments Off
About this presentation
Warby Parker started, like most businesses, with frustration. Co-CEO Neil Blumenthal and his co-founders found purchasing glasses extremely tedious and unnecessarily expensive. So, they created their own solution. 

But what were the actual steps the team took to take Warby Parker from an idea to business? Blumenthal shares how Warby Parker started by dramatically simplifying their message to focus on fashion first, price second, and social mission third. They then ”shouted the idea from the rooftops” to get as much input as possible.

Next, they took a series of rapid but small steps to iterate until launching with a series of inexpensive, but impactful, marketing tactics like creating a behind the scenes “annual report” that was spread widely around the web. ”You build trust by giving it away. Brands can do better than sitting in the Ivory Tower,” says Blumenthal. “If you want to build deep relationships you have to show some warts.”

About Neil Blumenthal
Neil Blumenthal loves helping people see. Determined to radically transform the eyewear industry, Neil and three friends launched Warby Parker in February of 2010.

Warby Parker designs and sells vintage-inspired frames and prescription lenses for $95 whereas comparable quality glasses cost $500. For every pair sold, a pair is given to someone in need. To date, Warby Parker has distributed over 100,000 pairs to those in need around the world.

Neil had been the Director of VisionSpring, a non-profit social enterprise that trains low-income women to start their own business selling affordable eyeglasses to individuals living on less than $4 per day in South Asia, Africa and Latin America. He was responsible for developing VisionSpring’s award-winning strategy (Fast CompanySocial Capitalist Award ’08, ’07 and ’05) and expanding VisionSpring’s global presence from one to 10 countries. In 2005, Neil was named a Fellow for Emerging Leaders in Public Service at NYU Robert F. Wagner School for Public Service.

Prior to joining VisionSpring, he worked with the International Crisis Group and attended the Institute for International Mediation and Conflict Resolution in The Hague, Netherlands. Neil received his BA from Tufts University and his MBA from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania where he was both a Social Enterprise Fellow and a Leadership Fellow. Neil and his wife, jewelry designer Rachel Leigh, live in NYC

Links

Time Profile
Warby Parker
@neilblumenthal


Top Weekend Reads: The New Skills Required to Nab Top Jobs

Posted: April 18th, 2014 | Author: behanceteam | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off
Designed by Yazmin Alanis for the Noun Project

Designed by Yazmin Alanis for the Noun Project

As we do every Friday, we’ve collected our most-shared Twitter links for your weekend reading pleasure.

From around the web:

From 99U:

For more, make sure to follow us on Twitter.


The Weekender: Summer’s just around the corner, celebrate with this week’s Weekender

Posted: April 18th, 2014 | Author: It's Nice That | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

Mainwe

Hey guys! For us Brits in the UK it’s actually a Bank Holiday weekend right now, which means we’re going to spend the next four days drinking shandies in the sun and being forced by children to hunt for eggs in damp, pansy-ridden back gardens – fun! The Bank Holiday gives everyone in the UK a feeling of magic, a tickle of fire in the belly, a feeling that anything and everything is possible. And maybe it is. Let The Weekender guide you into what could be the best weekend of your life.

Read more

Advertise here via BSA


Fight Productivity Paralysis With the 2-Minute Rule

Posted: April 18th, 2014 | Author: behanceteam | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off
hourglass

Hour Glass designed by Bohdan Burmich from the Noun Project

 

The feeling that you get from crossing things off your to-do list can be addicting. It’s easy to get caught in the trap of adding absolutely everything to your system, including things that can be done in two minutes or less. With enough small and insignificant tasks, you can clog your system and lose considerable time and focus. And if you overwhelm your system enough, you might even paralyze your productivity completely.

Management consultant and author of Getting Things Done, David Allen, has a two-minute rule that can not only make your projects move forward incessantly, but it can also prevent many small things from overloading your system in the first place:

If you determine an action can be done in two minutes, you actually should do it right then because it’ll take longer to organize it and review it than it would be to actually finish it the first time you notice it.

Thinking of your time in two-minute increments will allow you to get a lot of things done.  When you simply do something, you eliminate all of the prioritizing, scheduling and picking of tasks. As Allen put it in a recent interview with Success magazine, the rule “is actually tricking you into making an executive decision about what is the next thing that needs to happen and that’s really the training people need.”  The two-minute rule is in essence, a mind-trick. 


Mixtape: A bank holiday Friday mix from NTS radio’s very own Shane Connolly!

Posted: April 18th, 2014 | Author: Liv Siddall | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

Main

Here ya go! Another installment from the music men at the ever-brilliant NTS Radio, this time from Shane Connolly (or Shamos), creative director of the station. “I run a night called LIFE which has been running for almost three years where I invite record collectors and music lover to play the music they love,” Shane tells us. “This mix is quite different to what I play out, but is definitely music I love and listen to on my own so this is a good chance to play it.” It’s Bank Holiday, so it’s the perfect time to make a fresh batch of coffee, get the daffodils in the vase, put your feet (no shoes) on the sofa and turn this up.

Read more

Advertise here via BSA


Things #8: With typographic experiments and a book that’s actually a lamp

Posted: April 18th, 2014 | Author: Maisie Skidmore | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

List

It’s Easter weekend! That magical, once in a year religious occasion which grants you not one but two Bank Holidays, and an anything-goes pass to bask in all the sugary confectionary your body will allow you to consume! It’s a happy time of year, and we’re celebrating with a collection of stuff that we’ve been sent that we think is awesome and that we think you’ll like too. This week’s Things include a catalogue of Studio 75B’s lesser known projects, a story which does crazy things with type, a souvenir from a trip, an adventure beneath the sea and last but not least a book that turns into a lamp. A LAMP! I know. Enjoy!

Read more

Advertise here via BSA


Are You in Motion or Are You Taking Action?

Posted: April 17th, 2014 | Author: behanceteam | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off
Motion designed by Nick Abrams from the Noun Project.

Motion designed by Nick Abrams from the Noun Project.

When dealing with clients and working with teams, it’s not uncommon to hear the phrase “get the ball rolling” when describing project progress. But are the phone calls, emails and scheduling of meetings actually considered work? A costly mistake for many is confusing the idea of being in motion with simply taking action. Our real job, the action, should be to produce the actual deliverable. While motion and action might sound similar, they’re not the same. In a recent blog post, entrepreneur and travel photographer James Clear distinguished the two as follows:

Motion is when you’re busy doing something, but that task will never produce an outcome by itself. Action, on the other hand, is the type of behavior that will get you a result.

There are many strategies for taking action, but two that have worked for Clear are:

1. Set a schedule for your actions.
2. Pick a date to shift you from motion to action.

Being in motion is not only an inevitable part of getting things done, it’s integral. But we can’t get lost in it. Clear offers a simple way to refocus by asking: “Are you doing something? Or are you just preparing to do it? Are you in motion? Or are you taking action?” Don’t get caught up measuring progress by steps you’ve completed. In the words of ten-time NCAA National Championship winning coach John Wooden, “Never mistake activity for achievement.” Instead, be relentlessly focused on the end-goal. Motion will never produce a final result. Action will. Read the rest of Clear’s blog on motion vs. action here.


The Difference Between Projects and Processes

Posted: April 17th, 2014 | Author: behanceteam | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off
Designed by Kevin Laity for the Noun Project

Designed by Kevin Laity for the Noun Project

Starting a new project is an exciting experience that often requires new ways of thinking. However, when faced with multiple competing deadlines, we can be quick to treat a project like a process for the sake of efficiency. This could prove to be detrimental not only to the new project, but to existing processes and worse – to the overall growth of an enterprise. In Startup Leadership, author and professor Derek Lidow shares the dangers of confusing projects with processes:

Confusion between projects and process stifles growth and destroys value, causing a great frustration among many entrepreneurs…Whether their mission is to make money or to create social good, everything an enterprise creates is the largely the result of its projects and processes. 

Lidow summarizes the major differences between projects and processes and some important ways that they relate to one another: 

Projects

Processes

Have never done this before.

Do the same thing repeatively.

Goals are about creating something new or about implementing a change.

Goal is to create value by repeatively performing a task.

Project objectives and plans can be changed by whoever gives the project team its mandate and resources, provided the team also agrees.

Processes can be successfully changed only with significant planning and investment (a project is required to change a process).

Significant leadership is required to plan and execute a successful project.

Processes are managed, not led, unless they are to be changed.

Projects create change.

Processes resist change.

Projects and processes are completely different and Derek Lidow stresses that understanding their differences – and how they interrelate – is crucial to growth. In order to grow an enterprise properly, projects and processes must be used in balance.

Learn why Derek Lidow thinks real innovation comes from projects, in his Wall Street Journal article.


Typography is a practice

Posted: April 17th, 2014 | Author: Mark Sinclair | Filed under: Digital, Graphic Design, Type / Typography | Comments Off

Adobe's Typekit has just launched a new site dedicated to honing typographic skills, via a series of lessons and resources, under the name Typekit Practice...

"Typekit Practice is a collection of resources and a place to try things, hone your skills, and stay sharp," runs the site's introduction. "Everyone can practice typography."

On offer are featured lessons, including one on using shades for "eye-catching emphasis", a list of useful online references (blogs, articles, talks etc), and a reading list of books on typography. Of course, there are also links to Typekit's own fonts and its accompanying blog.

The Practice site is designed and maintainted by Elliot Jay Stocks, Tim Brown, Bram Stein and the Typekit team.

Aimed at both the type novice and expert, Typekit Practice is certainly informative – the lesson on shades offers some good pointers as to the various shading techniques available – from 'drop' and 'close' shades to 'offset' and 'printer's' iterations – while the site itself is clearly laid out and nicely written.

As Brown writes on the TK blog, " Lessons stand on a foundation of references to articles, blog posts, books, websites, talks, and other solid resources."

"For example, John Downer explains why sign painters shade letters to the lower left, Nick Cox reviews Typofonderie's Ambroise, and Typekit's own David Demaree ruminates on Hi-DPI typography. We're working hard to accurately cite the sources of references, so that readers have a starting point for further research."

It looks like Typekit Practice could evolve into a useful collection of hints and tips for those starting to play with typographic technique, and for others looking for some well-researched information on the discipline.

"We have lots of ideas for Typekit Practice," writes Brown, "plus an extraordinary group of authors and teachers helping us think up valuable lessons and make good references. Come practice with us."

See practice.typekit.com.


Ad of the Week: Ikea, Wonderful Everyday

Posted: April 17th, 2014 | Author: Eliza Williams | Filed under: Advertising | Comments Off

Our Ad of the Week is this simple yet captivating spot from Mother for Ikea, which sends a kitchen into a spin...

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/qlOUBaTjTIc?version=3&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/qlOUBaTjTIc?version=3&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

The spot advertises Ikea's Metod kitchen system, which has been developed to allow flexibility for the various needs of families. To suggest that, the ad shows a busy family kitchen that is on a constantly moving carousel but where everything is nonetheless happening smoothly.

Credits:
Agency: Mother
Director: Keith Schofield
Production company: Caviar