We're through creative a branding and digital agency from Macclesfield near Manchester. We've put together this site to create a source of inspiration, we hope you like it.

Springfield Private Label Redesign – Unified Grocers

Posted: November 22nd, 2014 | Author: Derrick Lin | Filed under: Americas, Food, Redesigned, USA | Comments Off

Creative Agency: Murray Brand Communications
Location: United States of America

After directing brand equity research and developing Springfield's new positioning and messaging hierarchy, Murray Brand Communications designed a new brandmark and packaging system for Unified Grocer's Springfield portfolio of products. Comprised of more than 800 SKUs, the brand facelift was undertaken to update Springfield's product messaging, elevate its perceived quality and expand its market acceptance by attracting consumers ranging from more value-conscious to higher-income shoppers.

To support the brand's core essence of neighborly, trusted quality and value, an evolutionary new brandmark was designed to link the brand to the corner street signs often found in small-town America. To communicate that Springfield products deliver the best in freshness and ingredients, a green and yellow color palette was selected to complement a newly designed illustration depicting the fertile farmlands, clear skies and fresh foliage of the spring season. As a final design element, a vertical banner system was employed to stage product names, flavor profiles and benefit statements allowing a quick and easy read no matter the product category.

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Ding dong the week is dead, the wicked week has lost its head and that means one thing…

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: It's Nice That | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

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And so the week is winding down and we’re all having a little jig thinking about the wonders and delights the next two days has to offer. But before we leave y’all, check out some things what we did this week and then the usual feckless collection of the weird and wonderful bits and bobs that made it into our eyes this week. There may or may not be a crow doing winter sports (there is).

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Why Community Managers Are the New Brand Managers

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: behanceteam | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

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Whereas brands used to push their products and messages out in what was essentially a one-way conversation, the social web has transformed it into a two-way conversation. Which means that we have to learn to speak authentically and honestly to our customers, and that we can’t hide when we make mistakes.

To learn how to deftly navigate this new dynamic, we chatted up one of the most talked-about brands on the social web—Warby Parker, the eyeglasses-cum-lifestyle brand that has been a mad success from day one. Here, co-founder and co-CEO Neil Blumenthal breaks down how to be okay with leading a brand that you can’t totally control:

Where do you think brands go wrong when they’re trying to build an authentic relationship with customers? 
People have extremely sensitive BS detectors these days. We’ve all been inundated with advertisements since we started walking and talking. So we can pick up on a brand’s authenticity—or fakeness—immediately. As a brand, you can only engender trust if you’re being transparent. Brands have never been able to control what their customers say about them, but now, thanks to the Internet, customers are more empowered than ever to disseminate their experiences with a brand. Companies can’t hide. If you make a mistake, or you do something wrong, it’s going to get out there. And if you’re not proactive about responding when it happens, you’re going to dig yourself into a deeper hole. 

What’s the best way to go about being “proactive” when something goes wrong? 
I think it goes back to transparency. The first thing to do is admit it. Explain what happened and apologize. Your customers can be very understanding provided that you enable them to be understanding, which means that you need to have an honest discussion with them and fess up when you make a mistake. 

For instance, think about if you call any of our favorite cell phone carriers. [laughs] It used to be that they were just rude and didn’t solve your problem. Now, they’re often polite, but they still don’t solve your problems. So, they’re getting a little bit better, but you still want to break your phone in half after one of those conversations. 

So being polite and friendly and apologizing is part of it. But it’s just the first part. Then you have to actually correct the situation. For us, that might be offering a discount, it might be offering free glasses, it might be doing whatever it takes to get that person a pair of glasses before they go on vacation. It’s the little things that make a brand great. It’s about being diligent with details, keeping your antennae sensitive to what customers want, and responding in a way that’s authentic to your brand. It sounds intuitive, but the fact is that many brands are not treating their customers the way they want to be treated. 

Do you think the dynamic of the social web means there’s more of an interplay between customers and brands than there’s been in the past? Can brands still control the conversation? 
I was talking to Troy Carter—an investor who also used to be Lady Gaga’s manager—the other day, and he made a really interesting observation. We were discussing Warby Parker, and he said, “It’s not your brand; it’s our brand.” “Our” being the public. And I think he’s right: You do not control your brand anymore. You can influence it and help guide the conversation, but there’s a limit to how precisely you can define your brand on your own. 

This idea that a brand will conform to a nice PowerPoint presentation with a strict brand architecture and messaging hierarchy is no longer the case. Your brand is part of conversations that are being had in the streets, on Twitter, and on Instagram. And the best that you can do is help influence that dialogue by giving people reasons to talk positively about it. These days, your community managers are your brand managers.


This is an excerpt from 99U’s new book, Make Your Mark, which features 21 essays and interviews on building a creative business with impact.

Get  “Make Your Mark” now –>

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Epica Awards 2014: The Winners

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Eliza Williams | Filed under: Advertising, Graphic Design | Comments Off

The winners of this year's Epica Awards were announced last night at a ceremony held in Amsterdam. There were big wins for BBDO New York, Leo Burnett Toronto, Publicis Conseil, 72andSunny Netherlands, and Leo Burnett Beirut...

The Epica Awards is the only advertising and design awards programme judged solely by journalists. This year's judging was held in Amsterdam, with journos from around the world flying in to offer their views on the year's top work. Five Grand Prix awards were given this year, with two pieces of work in the Digital and Integrated category receiving the top gong.

Epica has an increasingly global outlook, with the Grand Prix awards given to agencies in five different countries, across three continents. In total, agencies from 74 countries submitted work this year.

Now, onto the winners...

The Film Grand Prix was awarded to BBDO New York for The Boy Who Beeped, an emotional film that forms part of a series from the agency for GE. The ad fought off stiff competition from Harvey Nichols and Heineken, among others, to take the top prize in this coveted category.

The Outdoor Grand Prix went to Publicis Conseil in France for its elegant poster campaign to announce the reopening of Paris Zoo.

For the Press Grand Prix, the award went to Leo Burnett Beirut for its clever campaign for Virgin, which aims to highlight the injustice of music piracy by pointing out just out hard it is to write a hit song, using clever and entertaining infographics.

The first of the two Grand Prix awards in the Digital and Integrated category went to the juggernaut that is the Always Like A Girl film, which asks us to reassess our use of the expression 'like a girl' and turn it into something empowering rather than critical (while also selling some sanitary products along the way).

The final Grand Prix of this year's Epica Awards went to Night Walk in Marseilles, a project created by Google and 72andSunny Netherlands, which offers users a chance to walk the streets of the French city by night on their mobile, tablet or online, discovering many delights along the way. The case study film above explains the project in more detail.

Alongside the Grand Prix awardees, other big winners on the night included adam&eveDDB, which won Agency of the Year after picking up 30 awards across all the categories, including 15 golds. Network of the Year went to Leo Burnett, which won 92 awards in total, including 26 golds. And finally, Heineken was given the Brand Tribute Award, a new award for this year, in recognition of the brand's commitment to creating creative and innovative work.

In addition to the Grand Prix winners, lots of great work received golds, silvers and bronze awards at this year's Epicas. To view all of this work, go to the Epica Awards website, here.


An interview with the Design Museum’s Women Fashion Power graphics creator

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Emily Gosling | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

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When the Design Museum planned its Women Fashion Power show, which opened last month, it was very much keen to take the “women” component seriously, appointing them to take care of both the exhibition design and graphics for the show. As such, it drafted perhaps one of the most famous women in design’s practices, Zaha Hadid Architects for the exhibition design; with Lucienne Roberts and her team (Dave Shaw and John McGill) at LucienneRoberts+ creating the graphics.

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Where print meets digital – In praise of The New Yorker’s Cover Story feature

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Liv Siddall | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

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It’s not often you get to hear the story behind the cover of a magazine, but personally whenever I catch someone speaking of it, my ears prick up in excitement. Our magazine Printed Pages is quarterly, and the cover is often a too-many-cooks, arguing around a table sort of affair – which I actually love. What’s always boggled my mind is how The New Yorker goes through this gruelling tongue-biting process every week. It’s largely down to cartoon expert and art editor of The New Yorker, Francoise Mouly. Her and cover-obsessive contributor Mina Kaneko spend their time debating and discussing which artist would be up for the challenge of inhaling the essence of New York at that very moment, and translating it into an instantly engaging, witty image. The best part is, once the cover is out into the world, they speak to the artist about the process of making it, and what the city means to them.

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Giant surreal graphite drawings from the inimitable Frank Magnotta

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: James Cartwright | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

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Way back in 2011 when we first posted the work of Frank Magnotta It’s Nice That was a very different beast – we’d only give you one image to check out and the rest was up to you. So when I stumbled across Frank’s work again this week it seemed essential that we show you a whole lot more. To be honest there have been few updates to his site in the past three years but the work is breathtaking, pulling together pop culture references, architectural precision and some serious Americana and combining it into stark surrealist landscapes. At times grotesque but always engaging, Frank’s graphite artworks are still some of the finest around.

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Death has never looked so decadent as in Paul Koudounaris’ nuts photos

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Emily Gosling | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

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Ever wondered what happens when you die? Do our souls live on in heaven, frolicking about with those of our lost loved ones? Is there a dark, black nothingness? Or do we get stuffed to the eyeballs with gems and a big shiny crown thrust on our heads until we’re all trussed up like a little skeleton Liberace?

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CR December: The Photography Annual

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Photography, Type / Typography | Comments Off

December's CR is a double issue and features our Photography Annual; 80-pages of the best in editorial, advertising, fashion, stock and personal work...

This year's Photography Annual includes some fantastic imagery from a wide range of experienced practitioners and relative newcomers. We launched the special issue last night at the Design Museum and were able to celebrate the achievements of those whose work is featured in its pages and the seven projects which were judged Best in Book. Congratulations to all.

Flip the issue over, and up front in the regular CR half we look at how Precision Printing worked to produce this year's Photography Annual cover; take a look at the best of this year's Christmas ads; and look at the Barry Island climbing wall which doubles as an art installation. We also have Bagpuss as we 'almost' new him.

In the columns, Daniel Benneworth-Gray struggles to cope with two new demanding clients in his life – a poorly wife and child; while in Logo Log, Michael Evamy explores the power of punctuation in branding – on the back of the NSPCC's recent logo redesign.

Kicking off our main features, Patrick Burgoyne talks to designer Vince Frost about his new self-helf book, Design Your Life. In it Frost explains how the same design principles which work for clients can be applied to making our personal lives better.

 

Patrick also investigates the social and political challenges that our ageing populations pose to Western economies – and looks at the opportunities that might arise, too.

Eliza Williams examines a year in which native advertising established itself as a controversial presence in our media landscape...

...and in using materials that change colour in the wind – or even react to brain activity – Rachael Steven talks to The Unseen, an 'exploration house' effortlessly combining art and chemistry.

French graphic designer and illustrator Jean Jullien is much in-demand at the moment and Mark Sinclair talks to him about his work to date as he leaves his adopted home of London for New York.

 

Five years ago, Sophie Ebrand swapped life as an advertising account manager for that of a professional photographer – and she's never looked back. Eliza Williams meets her.

In Crit, Jean Grogan attends a Paris conference on the work of type designer, artist and ad man Roger Excoffon, whose work is enjoying something of a revival at the moment...

... and Craig Oldham is also conference bound – to Manchester's People's History Museum for an event dedicated to the history of the political poster in Britain.

Finally, Paul Belford celebrates a type-only poster designed by the late Alan Fletcher which proves that working counter-intuitively can pay off in a big way.


A process film to show others how it should be done from Aesop

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Rob Alderson | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

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It’s fair to say that at some point towards the end of last year we reached peak process video, subsumed by a wave of formulaic offerings that were neither interesting nor exciting. So when we came across this new film from Aesop, slightly pompously called The Guild of Artisans it didn’t quicken our pulses. But in actual fact beyond the title, this is a rare example of a process film that’s well worth a watch. It follows the journey of Aesop’s jars and bottles being crafted and although there’s one or two things we’ve seen before, the moody imagery is brilliantly shot and there’s a few moments which set the teeth on edge. Anyone planning a craft process film in the near future take note; this is how it should be done!

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