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New type

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Rachael Steven | Filed under: Books, Graphic Design, Type / Typography | Comments Off

This month’s pick of new type designs, projects and events includes new releases from foundries Klim and Blackletra, a lovely letterpress printed newspaper and an exhibition exploring type and manual printing methods from Fraser Muggeridge...

Spot Mono

First up, though, is Berlin type foundry and design studio Schick Toikka’s latest release, Spot Mono. Available in four weights with an extended icon set, its design is inspired by contemporary Japanese display typefaces and classic typewriter faces such as Courier.

Images via Schick Toikka

Shick Toikka has produced some great typefaces this year – including a bespoke design for the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York – and this is no exception. To promote its release, the studio has also produced a three-colour risograph printed specimen book (limited to 100 copies). Buy it at schick-toikka.com

Gandur

Blackletra founder Daniel Sabino's last font release was the angular graphic script Haltrix - featured in Gareth Hague's article on type trends in our July issue (which you can read here). His latest type family, Gandur, is the result of an investigation into two ideas: "the intersection of geometry and calligraphy, and the morphological differences between Blackletter and Roman."

"The design began by adhering to a strict hexagonal grid but during its development, slowly moved from a purely geometric to a more pen-based design. This is especially true in the heaviest weights," explains Sabino.

For details, see blackletra.com

Domaine Sans

New Zealand type foundry Klim's latest release, Domaine Sans, is an elegant family of text and display typefaces. The design began with an exploration into sans serifs with contrast and follows the release of Domaine; a Latin serif based on a custom logotype which Klim founder Kris Sowersby designed for wine brand Hardys.

"Sans-serif typefaces with contrast are not very common these days," explains Sowersby on the Klim blog. "I suspect the spectre of Optima inhibits their use. I think Optima is a wonderful typeface—it’s the first cogent typeface with contrast, in my opinion—but anecdotal evidence suggests that amongst graphic designers it’s still quite divisive," he adds.

Domaine Sans Display was featured before its release in New York magazine's Spring Fashion 2014 issue, pictured below, which inspired Sowersby to work with Dave Foster on a Fine version with extra thin hairlines. It's a beautifully crafted design and you can read more about its development here, or buy it here.

Spread from the Spring Fashion issue of New York magazine, 2014. Image via klim.co.nz

Fraser Muggeridge - Mimeographica Alphabetica

Graphic designer Fraser Muggeridge's new exhibition at London's Whitechapel Gallery, open until 30 November, features a striking abstract alphabet display (below), created by overlaying and duplicating stencils. The show explores manual printing techniques and is part of a collaboration with secondary school students from Welling School in Kent. Also on display are two mimeograph printing machines, vintage stencil sets and manuals from Muggeridge's personal collection.

On October 30, Muggeridge is hosting a workshop at the exhibition, followed by a talk from designer Eric Kindel on the history of stencilled texts. For details or to book tickets, see whitechapelgallery.org

Extra Condensed

Extra Condensed is a beautifully produced letterpress newspaper from London printing studio Counter Press, described as an "occasional publication of work, musings and typographic meanderings."

The first issue is eight pages long and printed in black and flourescent orange in an edition of 150. Each page was designed, typeset and printed by hand using wood and metal type. Buy a copy from 27 October at thecounterpress.co.uk


Gratuitous Type - issue 4

The fourth issue of Elana Schlenker's Gratuitous Type - described as "a pamphlet of typographic smut" - features interviews with Claire Huss, Europa, Dries Wiewauters, Table of Contents, Raw Color, Letterproeftuin, Pure Magenta, Kokoro & Moi, Tim Lahan and Emmet Byrne.

As always, it features some fantastic imagery and some lovely touches, from the acetate wraparound cover with gold polka dots to a metallic debossed centrefold. To celebrate its launch, Schlenker is hosting an exhibition at KK Outlet in London until October 31 featuring prints, interactive projects and installations by creatives featured in the issue. You can also watch an interview with Schlenker and magCulture's Jeremy Leslie from this year's Modern Magazine Conference, where Schlenker delivered a talk on the publication, here.

gratuitoustype.com.

Glenfiddich Modern

Purple Creative launched a new brand identity for Scotch whisky Glenfiddich this week - the new logo features a redrawn stag made to look more "anatomically correct". The identity system also features two new bespoke typefaces from Fontsmith: Glenfiddich Modern, a headline typeface inspired by the brand's logotype and Founder's Script, loosely based on Glenfiddich founder William Grant's handwriting.


Images via Fontsmith

Fontsmith and Purple Creative worked with a graphologist to determine key traits in Grant's handwriting, which were adapted to create a more modern typeface with a nod to the brand's heritage. The typefaces will be rolled out across packaging and communications, and Glenfiddich Modern works well alongside the updated, streamlined logo.

 

Cookies - Music for Touching

Music for Touching, the debut album from Cookies (New York musician Ben Sterling), is packaged in a delightful typographic record sleeve designed by Tracy Ma, deputy creative director at Bloomberg Businessweek and Emily Keegin, an artist and creative director who studied photography at the Royal College of Art before moving to Brooklyn.

The vinyl edition comes with a companion newspaper, Tools for Touching, which features 20 images exploring "the sexuality of domestic-life through a series of sculptures fashioned from household objects, from a head massager to a spatula and a toothbrush (see below). It's bold, playful design and a great use of type.

You can order the 12" vinyl here.

Image via cookiesvision.bandcamp.com

Faile - Works on Wood

Works on Wood is a new book from urban art duo Faile (Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller), published by Gestalten. Packed with full-page photogaphs, it's a real visual treat and provides a comprehensive look at the pair's work with wood; from large-scale murals to ink on wood prints and hand carved prayer wheels.

Combining traditional techniques and materials with a an aesthetic influenced by street signs, MTV and advertising, the pair's work features some brilliant hand painted and carved type - much of which draws on signage and lettering found in Brooklyn, where they both live. "The mix of colours, typefaces and advertising verbiage. The wear and tear. The stacking of new upon old. The variety of designs ... are all brilliant in their own way. It all came together to help inform the approach to language and typography throughout our work," explain Miller and McNeill in an introduction. It's a pleasure to read, and featured essays provide an insight into the pair's influences and processes.

Spread showing Choose Your Pleasure, 2009 Acrylic/silkscreen ink on wood in steel frame

Spreads showing boxes stacked in studio in process for Lost in Glimmering Shadows (2003)

Spread showing Prayer Wheels from Lost in Glimmering Shadows.

Spread showing The Plant Building and Mural in Times Square, New York, 2014


Bagpuss, the marmalade cat

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Mark Sinclair | Filed under: Illustration, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

Emily's cat Bagpuss; the most important, the most beautiful, the most magical saggy old cloth cat in the whole wide world. And as new book The Art of Smallfilms reveals – originally, marmalade. So what happened to him?

The Art of Smallfilms, published by Four Corners Books (see our longer piece on the book here) charts the history of the Kentish studio set up by Oliver Postgate in 1959 and which went on to produce several classics of children's animation, from The Clangers and Bagpuss, to Ivor the Engine and Noggin the Nog.

Postgate's creative partner at Smallfilms was the illustrator Peter Firmin. He made the models, figures and sets for all of the above and drew many of the characters as sketches prior to modelling.

In the book's chapter on Bagpuss, one sketch in particular jumps out. It's clearly of our lethargic hero but he looks a little different: he's orange. The caption states that it's the "first colour idea" for the moggy.

According to the book, in 1973 Bagpuss was originally conceived as a marmalade cat, but when the material for his stripey coat was manufactured at Dunbar Fabrics in Folkestone – they used pink by mistake. Which, of course, turned out to be just the right colour for Bagpuss and possibly one of the most magical, most beautiful, most serendipitous moments in Smallfilms's history.

Also of interest to Bagpuss fans will be the drawing reproduced in the book which reveals that Professor Yaffle started life as a 'Professor Bogwood', a human character that was deemed too gloomy and too out of place among the other characters. He was then reconfigured as the woodpecker bookend we all know and love (initially without the trademark specs).

The Art of Smallfilms – The Work of Oliver Postgate and Peter Firmin, edited by Jonny Trunk and Richard Embray, is published by Four Corners Books; £25. The book is designed by John Morgan and features photography by Eva Herzog. Art direction by Morgan and Kirsten Hecktermann.

 


Bagpuss, the marmalade cat

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Mark Sinclair | Filed under: Illustration, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

Emily's cat Bagpuss; the most important, the most beautiful, the most magical saggy old cloth cat in the whole wide world. And as new book The Art of Smallfilms reveals – originally, marmalade. So what happened to him?

The Art of Smallfilms, published by Four Corners Books (see our longer piece on the book here) charts the history of the Kentish studio set up by Oliver Postgate in 1959 and which went on to produce several classics of children's animation, from The Clangers and Bagpuss, to Ivor the Engine and Noggin the Nog.

Postgate's creative partner at Smallfilms was the illustrator Peter Firmin. He made the models, figures and sets for all of the above and drew many of the characters as sketches prior to modelling.

In the book's chapter on Bagpuss, one sketch in particular jumps out. It's clearly of our lethargic hero but he looks a little different: he's orange. The caption states that it's the "first colour idea" for the moggy.

According to the book, in 1973 Bagpuss was originally conceived as a marmalade cat, but when the material for his stripey coat was manufactured at Dunbar Fabrics in Folkestone – they used pink by mistake. Which, of course, turned out to be just the right colour for Bagpuss and possibly one of the most magical, most beautiful, most serendipitous moments in Smallfilms's history.

Also of interest to Bagpuss fans will be the drawing reproduced in the book which reveals that Professor Yaffle started life as a 'Professor Bogwood', a human character that was deemed too gloomy and too out of place among the other characters. He was then reconfigured as the woodpecker bookend we all know and love (initially without the trademark specs).

The Art of Smallfilms – The Work of Oliver Postgate and Peter Firmin, edited by Jonny Trunk and Richard Embray, is published by Four Corners Books; £25. The book is designed by John Morgan and features photography by Eva Herzog. Art direction by Morgan and Kirsten Hecktermann.

 


Skip Monday Blues with Sort-Your-Life-Out Sundays

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Hamza Khan | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off
Watch by Julien Deveaux from The Noun Project

Watch by Julien Deveaux from The Noun Project

When asked in an interview about how he structures his work week, Jack Dorsey (co-founder of Twitter and Square) said: “Sunday is [for] reflections, feedback, strategy and getting ready for the rest of the week.”

Laura Vanderkam, author of “What the Most Successful People Do on the Weekend,” observed that weekends, especially Sundays, are crucial when it comes to getting clear and prepared for the coming week. She’s dubbed the process of recalibrating yourself on the sabbath as “Sort-Your-Life-Out-Sunday.”

[On Sunday,] do something you love Monday to Friday. When the conditions of your job are right, you can start the week excited about it. You like the work for its own sake and hence, it isn’t a cause of anxiety.

But another, perhaps more practical, idea is to schedule something fun for Sunday nights. Get together for a game night with friends. Have people over for dinner. Find an adult soccer league that plays on Sunday nights. Go to religious services. Volunteer with your family somewhere. In nice weather when it stays light late, go for a long bike ride or walk. The key is to figure out something you’d really enjoy doing, then plan it ahead of time.

Think of it as performing a more comprehensive and personal version David Allen’s infamous weekly review. Sort your life out on Sunday, and you’ll hit Monday ready to go!

[via]


Felicitations! School’s out and so you know what that means – it’s The Weekender

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: It's Nice That | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

Weekender-list

To stop you losing any more precious minutes when we lose an hour on Sunday, here at It’s Nice That we’ve kindly gathered all the important stuff you should be wrapping your eyes around before they’re left sadly squinting in darkness. You know because we’re nice like that. Let us be your light. Here’s The Weekender.

Read more

Advertise here via BSA


Scott King art directs new UAL student magazine

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Mark Sinclair | Filed under: Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Type / Typography | Comments Off

Cover image photography by Tyrone Lebon. Cover graphic: Mark James Works

The debut issue of Artefact, the new newspaper for the University of the Arts London, features well-honed student journalism, imagery by a range of established artists and photographers and an influential name in the art director's chair: Scott King. I talked to him and the London College of Communication's Simon Hinde about the launch of the new project...

With its debut issue out this month Artefact will replace UAL's current student paper, Arts London News. As LCC's journalism and publishing programme leader, Hinde felt that ALN didn't reflect the kind of exciting journalism that could come from a student-led publication.

Equally, the format seemed restrictive and old-fashioned – the magazine was laid out according to templates, Hinde explains, with guidance from journalism staff with a background in newspaper layout. While the students saw the value in a publication being produced by the course, they were not particularly engaged.

Illustration by 123RF.com

"If you wander around Shoreditch and Soho you see a host of brilliant and exciting magazines produced by talented young people who are thinking differently about what journalism is and could be – and it seemed to me that our students could do the same," Hinde says.

Enter King – a recently appointed chair of visual communication at UAL – who on meeting Hinde agreed to art direct the project (he is interviewed below). King now works primarily as an artist but has a well-earned reputation for his work on magazines in the 1990s and early 2000s, having been art director of i-D and creative director of Sleazenation. Since then he has also designed and art directed several books and self-published works.

"Fundamentally, I wanted the thing to be outward-looking," says Hinde, "to talk to its audience not as students at UAL but as young people living in London, with all the social, cultural, artistic and political interests that implies. The magazine comes out of LCC but it should be something that people from a much wider community that our university can engage with."

Photography by Casey Orr

The writing is certainly strong – it's engaging and outward-looking, too – but it's interesting to note that the visual side of the magazine, its design and imagery, has come from outside of the college's student body.

King worked on the magazine with designer Oswin Tickler, a UAL alumnus who works out of the studio Smallfury, but on Artefact's debut issue at least, the college's design students were only involved during the initial stages – something Hinde is keen to develop further. As most of the work was carried out over the summer months, Hinde says, the students simply weren't around to contribute – but King and Tickler's template for the magazine can now be taken on by the students.

"We're in the early stages of this project and I'm keen to use talent from around the college and university," Hinde adds. "In our next issue, and in future issues, illustration and photography students will be providing artwork to illustrate articles. My intention is to broaden and deepen relationships with other courses and I hope this will include graphic design students, too."

Hinde's ambitions for the publication are such that he says he would like to see the magazine in shops, bars and cafes all over the capital. "I also want [it] to be unambiguously professional in its outlook and ambition: not to be a compromised 'student magazine'," he says. "The main stipulation I had was that it should showcase student writing at different lengths and in different styles and I think [Scott's] done an incredible job of doing that."

Below, I talk to King about his return to magazines and his design direction for Artefact.

 

Creative Review: What tempted you back to art directing a magazine again? What did Simon ask you to do with Artefact design-wise?

Scott King: Well, I've always continued to do self-published work in various forms, as well as books with JRP|Ringier and writing for Arena Homme+, but this is the first time in many years that I've art directed a magazine that you might describe as 'a commercial format' – one where I didn't wholly have control over the words or the contents, so it was very tough!

But I'm pleased with the results. Simon and I first discussed this project at the start of 2014, so it's taken a long time to come to fruition. I think the whole thing has been much more difficult than either of us imagined it would be. Simon didn't really have any pre-requisites design-wise, but it is, in some ways, a vehicle for journalism students, so legibility/readability were certainly part of the criteria – the students seemed to want it to have 'attitude' too – so I hope it has both of these things.

I really just tried to heighten the stakes by inviting many well known artists and photographers to contribute, which they very kindly did – the idea being that the magazine would then have a life beyond UAL and would hopefully become a foundation for the students to work from.

Artworks by Linder Sterling

Photography by Gareth McConnell


 

CR: I like the set up between the Blackletter headlines/pull quotes and the typewriter font for the body text, but the layout of the type as a whole seems quite pared back ... unlike a lot of magazines at the moment. Can you tell us about the typeface choices?

SK: Yeah, I like that font combination too, it's very simple and almost makes itself work if it's done carefully. I was trying to imagine the whole thing being somewhere between a newspaper and an old fashioned pamphlet – not a stylish fanzine sort of pamphlet – but one of those old Marxist home-produced kind of things like Touchpaper, something that you might have seen on Sheffield University campus in 1978.

I'm not sure I achieved that, but I really just tried to make it very simple: the idea being that if I wasn't there to design it, so long as the images were great, the magazine would still look good. Oswin Tinkler then came in and made the final designs.

Photography by Luke Stephenson

 

CR: At A3 Artefact is nice and big – did this format influence how you approached the design? It must be great to have the space to show images by people like Linder and also Luke Stephenson's photography, for example, at that size?

SK: Well, it's funny you mention that. I've only ever designed one publication in an A3 format before, and if you get it right, it looks great – but if you get it wrong it just looks like a pointlessly oversized standard magazine. So, I actually found it very difficult to work in this format, it's really very 'physical' and really can't be done 'on screen' – it really needs to be printed and studied and changed a lot.

But yes, it's great to be able to work with brilliant images from world class artist's and photographers on this sort of format. But the success of this format absolutely depends on getting great images, then using all the space that you're perhaps not used to seeing in a magazine.

I'm not normally very diplomatic – but am undergoing a self-initiated programme of retraining – so I think all the images worked well at this scale; and they really did, more or less.

Illustration by Will Cooper Mitchell

Image by Mark James Works

 

CR: Your new role as a chair of visual communication means that – according to UAL – you can give students guidance based on industry experience and expertise. What advice or suggestions did you give (or would you give) to the students working on Artefact?

SK: I just think they should use it as a springboard. I think they should be proud of it and they should act quickly to capitalise on it – great magazines are entirely reliant on great contributors, great ideas, great arguments and inspired direction. So it's really up to them – but I hope this is the best possible start for them.

 

Artefact issue one (A3 format, 52 pages, free) is out now. It is produced, managed and edited by students on the third year of LCC's BA (Hons) Journalism course. More at artefactmagazine.com. Scott King's website is scottking.co.uk.

Writers: Danielle Agtani, Yasaman Ahmadzai, Ivo Aleixo, Beatrice Bosotti, Dominic Brown, Sean Coppack, Luke O'Driscoll, Ed Oliver, Ebi Osuobeni, Bianca Pascall, Corie Schwabenland, Emily Segameglio, Zeus Simcoe, Storm Simpson, Isabella Smith, Fraser Thorne, Diana Tleuliyeva, James Wood. Images: Charles Avery, Jeremy Deller, Pete Donaldson, Jason Evans, Will Henry, Tyrone Lebon, Gareth McConnell, Casey Orr, Mathew Sawyer, Corie Schwabenland, Isabella Smith, John Spinks, Luke Stephenson, Linder Sterling, Juergen Teller.

Artwork of the month: Fuck You to the future (without me), Mathew Sawyer, 2014, C-type print (courtesy the artist)


Ads of the Week

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Eliza Williams | Filed under: Advertising | Comments Off

Here's CR's pick of the best ads that we've seen these week: including work for Facebook, Virgin America, Lacoste, Full Circle, Google, and the UK's Coastguard service. First up though, a Halloween-inspired film for Ikea...

Created by BBH Asia Pacific (which was also behind the recent, brilliant Ikea 'bookbook' spot) for the Singapore market, the film sees Stanley Kubrick's classic horror The Shining reimagined in an Ikea store. Look out for key moments from the film referenced throughout. ECD: Scott McClelland; Creatives: Marcus Yuen, Angie Featherstone; Director: Jordan Quellman; Production company: Black Sheep Live.

Possibly in an attempt to counter the widely-published concerns about its Messenger app, Facebook has released this cute product demo which shows a couple acting out their romance using the service. Agency: Wieden + Kennedy; Creative directors: Stuart Harkness, Max Stinson; Design director: Guy Featherstone; Creatives: Matt Skibiak, David Povill, Zack Madrigal, Ollie Watson; Director: Aaron Duffy; Production company: 1st Avenue Machine.

Virgin America released this curious film online this week. Lasting almost six hours in length, it depicts a journey via Blah Airlines, a fictional budget flight carrier which offers a distinctly no frills experience – the underlying message, of course, being that a flight with VA would be much more entertaining. No one is expecting you to watch the whole thing but I kind of admire the commitment of making a six-hour-long piece of tedium. It also comes with a fake website too, naturally. Agency: Eleven Inc; CCO: Mike McKay; Creative director: Bryan Houlette; Senior copywriter: Aryan Aminzadeh; Copywriters: Jon Korn, Kevin X Barth; Director: Shillick.

Lacoste has ventured onto Vine with a series of films made with Vine and Instagram star Zach King. The two films released so far (one shown above, the other can be viewed on Lacoste's Vine channel) reveal how Lacoste has co-opted King's 'magic' style into the films for the brand, which are charming to watch. Agency: BETC; Creative directors: Ivan Beczkowski, Annick Teboul; Creatives: Nicolas Casanova, Lorene Garric, Emmanuelle Labbé; Production: Zach King.

Design studio DBLG inject some beautiful visuals into this new spot for business loans company Funding Circle, which do a good job of livening up the slightly dull voiceover. Agency: Karmarama; Creative directors: Sam Walker, Joe De Souza; Copywriter: Sam Cartmell; Directors: DBLG, Grant Gilbert, Rita Louro.

AMV BBDO has created this simple but powerful film for the UK's Coastguard service, which juxtaposes footage of a beautiful, peaceful day on a beach with audio of a panciked phone call where three people have been washed out to sea. Creatives: Nicholas Hulley, Nadja Lossgott; Directors: Thirtytwo; Production company: Pulse Films.

Rounding up this week's selection is a new film for Google Maps which has been created in partnership with the Jane Goodall Institute. It features the famed primatologist talking about her first visit to the Gombe National Park, which you can now travel to remotely via the Google Maps site. We've seen ads like this from Google before but this is an especially beautiful one and illustrates just how much of the planet has now been recorded by the tech company. Director: James W Griffiths; Production company: Indy8.


Bloomberg’s Tracy Ma talks us through her best and worst uni projects

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: James Cartwright | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

List

As Deputy Creative Director of Bloomberg Businessweek Tracy Ma is responsible for turning out page after page of stunningly-conceived graphics accompanying hard-hitting economic and political stories at breakneck speed. Together with Richard Turley and Rob Vargass she’s been responsible for transforming the title into a new benchmark for editorial design, receiving plenty of plaudits along the way. Of course it’s easy to assume that Tracy has always been visually gifted, but when we spoke to her about her university work she made it very clear that it took a long time for her to produce anything that she was really happy with…

Read more

Advertise here via BSA


New type

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Rachael Steven | Filed under: Books, Graphic Design, Type / Typography | Comments Off

This month’s pick of new type designs, projects and events includes new releases from foundries Klim and Blackletra, a lovely letterpress printed newspaper and an exhibition exploring type and manual printing methods...

Spot Mono

First up, though, is Berlin type foundry and design studio Schick Toikka’s latest release, Spot Mono. Available in four weights with an extended icon set, its design is inspired by contemporary Japanese display typefaces and classic typewriter faces such as Courier.

Images via Schick Toikka

Shick Toikka has produced some great typefaces this year – including a bespoke design for the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York – and this is no exception. To promote its release, the studio has also produced a three-colour risograph printed specimen book (limited to 100 copies). Buy it at schick-toikka.com

Gandur

Blackletra founder Daniel Sabino's last font release was the angular graphic script Haltrix - featured in Gareth Hague's article on type trends in our July issue (which you can read here). His latest type family, Gandur, is the result of an investigation into two ideas: "the intersection of geometry and calligraphy, and the morphological differences between Blackletter and Roman."

"The design began by adhering to a strict hexagonal grid but during its development, slowly moved from a purely geometric to a more pen-based design. This is especially true in the heaviest weights," explains Sabino.

For details, see blackletra.com

Domaine Sans

New Zealand type foundry Klim's latest release, Domaine Sans, is an elegant family of text and display typefaces. The design began with an exploration into sans serifs with contrast and follows the release of Domaine; a Latin serif based on a custom logotype which Klim founder Kris Sowersby designed for wine brand Hardys.

"Sans-serif typefaces with contrast are not very common these days," explains Sowersby on the Klim blog. "I suspect the spectre of Optima inhibits their use. I think Optima is a wonderful typeface—it’s the first cogent typeface with contrast, in my opinion—but anecdotal evidence suggests that amongst graphic designers it’s still quite divisive," he adds.

Domaine Sans Display was featured before its release in New York magazine's Spring Fashion 2014 issue, pictured below, which inspired Sowersby to work with Dave Foster on a Fine version with extra thin hairlines. It's a beautifully crafted design and you can read more about its development here, or buy it here.

Spread from the Spring Fashion issue of New York magazine, 2014. Image via klim.co.nz

Fraser Muggeridge - Mimeographica Alphabetica

Graphic designer Fraser Muggeridge's new exhibition at London's Whitechapel Gallery, open until 30 November, features a striking abstract alphabet display (below), created by overlaying and duplicating stencils. The show explores manual printing techniques and is part of a collaboration with secondary school students from Welling School in Kent. Also on display are two mimeograph printing machines, vintage stencil sets and manuals from Muggeridge's personal collection.

On October 30, Muggeridge is hosting a workshop at the exhibition, followed by a talk from designer Eric Kindel on the history of stencilled texts. For details or to book tickets, see whitechapelgallery.org

Extra Condensed

Extra Condensed is a beautifully produced letterpress newspaper from London printing studio Counter Press, described as an "occasional publication of work, musings and typographic meanderings."

The first issue is eight pages long and printed in black and flourescent orange in an edition of 150. Each page was designed, typeset and printed by hand using wood and metal type. Buy a copy from 27 October at thecounterpress.co.uk


Gratuitous Type - issue 4

The fourth issue of Elana Schlenker's Gratuitous Type - described as "a pamphlet of typographic smut" - features interviews with Claire Huss, Europa, Dries Wiewauters, Table of Contents, Raw Color, Letterproeftuin, Pure Magenta, Kokoro & Moi, Tim Lahan and Emmet Byrne.

As always, it features some fantastic imagery and some lovely touches, from the acetate wraparound cover with gold polka dots to a metallic debossed centrefold. To celebrate its launch, Schlenker is hosting an exhibition at KK Outlet in London until October 31 featuring prints, interactive projects and installations by creatives featured in the issue. You can also watch an interview with Schlenker and magCulture's Jeremy Leslie from this year's Modern Magazine Conference, where Schlenker delivered a talk on the publication, here.

gratuitoustype.com.

Glenfiddich Modern

Purple Creative launched a new brand identity for Scotch whisky Glenfiddich this week - the new logo features a redrawn stag made to look more "anatomically correct". The identity system also features two new bespoke typefaces from Fontsmith: Glenfiddich Modern, a headline typeface inspired by the brand's logotype and Founder's Script, loosely based on Glenfiddich founder William Grant's handwriting.


Images via Fontsmith

Fontsmith and Purple Creative worked with a graphologist to determine key traits in Grant's handwriting, which were adapted to create a more modern typeface with a nod to the brand's heritage. The typefaces will be rolled out across packaging and communications, and Glenfiddich Modern works well alongside the updated, streamlined logo.

 

Cookies - Music for Touching

Music for Touching, the debut album from Cookies (New York musician Ben Sterling), is packaged in a delightful typographic record sleeve designed by Tracy Ma, deputy creative director at Bloomberg Businessweek and Emily Keegin, an artist and creative director who studied photography at the Royal College of Art before moving to Brooklyn.

The vinyl edition comes with a companion newspaper, Tools for Touching, which features 20 images exploring "the sexuality of domestic-life through a series of sculptures fashioned from household objects, from a head massager to a spatula and a toothbrush (see below). It's bold, playful design and a great use of type.

You can order the 12" vinyl here.

Image via cookiesvision.bandcamp.com

Faile - Works on Wood

Works on Wood is a new book from urban art duo Faile (Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller), published by Gestalten. Packed with full-page photogaphs, it's a real visual treat and provides a comprehensive look at the pair's work with wood; from large-scale murals to ink on wood prints and hand carved prayer wheels.

Combining traditional techniques and materials with a an aesthetic influenced by street signs, MTV and advertising, the pair's work features some brilliant hand painted and carved type - much of which draws on signage and lettering found in Brooklyn, where they both live. "The mix of colours, typefaces and advertising verbiage. The wear and tear. The stacking of new upon old. The variety of designs ... are all brilliant in their own way. It all came together to help inform the approach to language and typography throughout our work," explain Miller and McNeill in an introduction. It's a pleasure to read, and featured essays provide an insight into the pair's influences and processes.

Spread showing Choose Your Pleasure, 2009 Acrylic/silkscreen ink on wood in steel frame

Spreads showing boxes stacked in studio in process for Lost in Glimmering Shadows (2003)

Spread showing Prayer Wheels from Lost in Glimmering Shadows.

Spread showing The Plant Building and Mural in Times Square, New York, 2014


Motif Wine

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: Derrick Lin | Filed under: Alcohol, austria, Europe, Germany | Comments Off

Creative Agency: EN GARD
Project Type: Commercial Work
Client: Motif Wine
Concept: Mario Rampitsch, Franz Lammer
Graphic Design and Art Direction: Kristina Bartosova
Photography: Stefan Leitner
Location: Austria & Germany

One essential aspect of the Motif concept is what we call the sixth sense: We have transformed taste, which is perceived through the nose and palate, into a graphic, or a motif. Motif consciously rejects the exclusive wine culture that is reserved for only a few people. Our goal is to facilitate an enjoyment of wine that is free from pre-conceptions, extremely personal, and, above all, conscious and aware. Our original vision was to reconceptualize the world of wine through a new product. We wanted to use a graphic pattern to visualize the taste and character of six different wines. This was how Motif came into being. The German word Motif means pattern, and we consciously refrain from using information about the variety of grape or other specifications on the label. Using no significant text, the individual patterns provide a subtle, tasteful indication of whether the wine is semi-sweet, full-bodied or effervescent. One of the challenges was the design of the labels, since they had to communicate the corporate design of Motif both individually and as a collective. The letter M, with lines placed at a 60-degree angle, serves as a key visual that unites all of the bottles under one corporate design. To enhance the visualization of the wine character, we chose earth tones and fresh warm colors: soft yellow or green tones for the white wines and powerful red and blue tones for the rosé.

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