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CR December: The Photography Annual

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Photography, Type / Typography | Comments Off

December's CR is a double issue and features our Photography Annual; 80-pages of the best in editorial, advertising, fashion, stock and personal work...

This year's Photography Annual includes some fantastic imagery from a wide range of experienced practitioners and relative newcomers. We launched the special issue last night at the Design Museum and were able to celebrate the achievements of those whose work is featured in its pages and the seven projects which were judged Best in Book. Congratulations to all.

Flip the issue over, and up front in the regular CR half we look at how Precision Printing worked to produce this year's Photography Annual cover; take a look at the best of this year's Christmas ads; and look at the Barry Island climbing wall which doubles as an art installation. We also have Bagpuss as we 'almost' new him.

In the columns, Daniel Benneworth-Gray struggles to cope with two new demanding clients in his life – a poorly wife and child; while in Logo Log, Michael Evamy explores the power of punctuation in branding – on the back of the NSPCC's recent logo redesign.

Kicking off our main features, Patrick Burgoyne talks to designer Vince Frost about his new self-helf book, Design Your Life. In it Frost explains how the same design principles which work for clients can be applied to making our personal lives better.

 

Patrick also investigates the social and political challenges that our ageing populations pose to Western economies – and looks at the opportunities that might arise, too.

Eliza Williams examines a year in which native advertising established itself as a controversial presence in our media landscape...

...and in using materials that change colour in the wind – or even react to brain activity – Rachael Steven talks to The Unseen, an 'exploration house' effortlessly combining art and chemistry.

French graphic designer and illustrator Jean Jullien is much in-demand at the moment and Mark Sinclair talks to him about his work to date as he leaves his adopted home of London for New York.

 

Five years ago, Sophie Ebrand swapped life as an advertising account manager for that of a professional photographer – and she's never looked back. Eliza Williams meets her.

In Crit, Jean Grogan attends a Paris conference on the work of type designer, artist and ad man Roger Excoffon, whose work is enjoying something of a revival at the moment...

... and Craig Oldham is also conference bound – to Manchester's People's History Museum for an event dedicated to the history of the political poster in Britain.

Finally, Paul Belford celebrates a type-only poster designed by the late Alan Fletcher which proves that working counter-intuitively can pay off in a big way.


Unit9 presents launches live action zombie game

Posted: November 19th, 2014 | Author: Rachael Steven | Filed under: Advertising, Digital, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

Unit9 has teamed up with a student director and producer to launch a live action zombie game sponsored by G-Shock. The game was launched under Unit9 presents, a scheme helping new creatives make interactive content combining film and gameplay...

Released online today, Five Minutes was directed by Maximilian Niemann and produced by Felix Faisst, both students at Germany’s Filmakademie Baden-Württemberg
. It begins with footage of a character in the midst of a zombie apocalypse, who is worried he may be 'infected' and has five minutes to decide whether to shoot himself and avoid joining the undead.

As the character John explains, the first symptom of infection is memory loss: the game switches between his flashbacks and attempts to defend himself and his daughter against attacking zombies. Viewers asked to tap, swipe and draw shapes with their finger or mouse to help fire guns, unlock doors and escape through a forest.

It's a compelling (and gory) piece of film and gameplay is fairly simple but engaging, although a little tricky for the not-so-steady of hand using a mouse. Players can choose from one of three levels of difficulty and can pause and replay parts of the game at any time. After a gruesome ending, they are also invited to share their score online.

To make the film, Niemann and Faisst taught themselves how to code and built a custom HTML framework, meaning the game can be played on any tablet or desktop device without installing an app. While it's not an official ad, the project was sponsored by G-Shock and features the brand's watches throughout (they are worn by both John and his daughter and used to count down throughout the five-minute period).

The pair came up with the idea for the film last year and pitched it to Unit9, who helped develop and release it. They have since been signed to the company for commercial work, although have still to finish their final year of studies. "Our goal was to create a different form of advertisement which involves the viewer in a fun and emotional way," they explain. "Although the viewer knows or has the feeling this is branded content, he should be able to enjoy it, to experience the brand without being constantly reminded of the product."

The project is one of several self-initiated interactive experiences that Unit9 has helped emerging directors produce and promote: in the past two years, it has worked with The Kissinger Twins on two interactive web films, Sufferosa and The Trip; a short film inspired by Rockstar Games' Grand Theft Auto series by Gevorg Karensky and The Most Northern Place, a web experience telling the fascinating story of Qaanaaq, an Inuit settlement and one of the world's northernmost towns.

Five Minutes is the first film to be produced under the Unit9 presents name, and co-founder Piero Frescobaldi says the company is keen to work with more creatives who can make engaging interactive content.

"Up until a few years ago, a lot of people in the digital interactive industry were pushing boundaries, and brands were braver," says Frescobaldi.

"For various reasons, it seems everyone is a little less willing to experiment. It's just a thing that happens cyclically, and I'm sure things will change, but it feels like everyone has retreated into their shell a little. It's up to us as creatives to just go out and make things, or promote people who do, and revitalise the industry that way, rather than waiting for the perfect brief," he explains.

While Unit9 presents will help promote and make films, Frescobaldi says creatives looking to work with the agency have to do more than just pitch an idea. "With Five Minutes, [Niemann and Faisst] came to me with an idea, they had shot some of the footage and written it, and I thought it was good, but told them I thought they should try and push it forward, to see what else they could do with it. A few months later, they sent me a link and had created a really engaging, emotional piece of work by teaching themselves to code," he says.

"What's amazing is that [Niemann and Faisst] are able to think about everything from colour grading and camera angles, to how it will work in HTML5. Nowadays, I think that is really important and I'm very excited, as I think we're starting to see a generational shift - young people who have an innate understanding of interactive technology and gameplay, who are training themselves in new mediums,” he says.

While there is no limit on the number of projects Unit9 presents will take on, Frescobaldi says it will only do so if the idea is sufficiently interesting, and directors show real promise.

"If students can make things like [Five Minutes], we can help with scripting and developing it, or using our following to market it and promote it," he adds. "And in parallel to this, with Five Minutes, we have a representation deal."

A zombie horror game isn’t an obvious choice of medium for a watch brand, or perhaps any brand, to showcase its products – in most scenes, John’s watch is covered in blood and pictured alongside a gaping wound in his arm – but it is an engaging piece of content, and Frescobaldi hopes projects like Five Minutes will encourage more companies to commission more experimental content online.

“Of course, as this wasn’t an official ad [G-Shock] don’t have to get the approval of multiple people, or spend big budgets on it – they are supporting a student project – but I hope it will stimulate people to take more risks,” he adds.

Play the game online (over 18s only) at fiveminutes.gs


Weather forecasts were never so much fun

Posted: November 18th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Digital | Comments Off

In a rather sweet 'internet of things' experiment from Uniform, three different data-powered devices react to imminent weather conditions

"Weather Systems explores the potential to combine cloud based weather data with physical connected devices, to create simple glanceable alerts and engaging user interactions," Uniform say.

The studio created three devices that use online weather data from Dark Sky API to provide "real-time forecasts that accurately illustrate what the localised weather conditions will be over the next 10 minutes". Sort of like a barometer for the 21st century but more up to the minute.

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Weather alerts can be set up so that the devices are triggered if, for example heavy rain is imminent. Forthcoming weather can be checked by pressing the single button on each device.

Particularly nice is the Rain System which uses a series of pins that move up and down striking a metal plate, evoking the look and sound of water splashing.

The project came off the back of a client piece that Uniform were working on for the Met Office which took live feeds from weather ships and buoys and used it to generate live visuals on a flip-dot display for a V&A event during the London Design Festival

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The Creative Review Annual 2015 is open for entries

Posted: November 17th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

The Creative Review Annual 2015 is now open for entries. Enter by Friday 12th December to have your work featured in our showcase of the year's finest work.

As our major awards scheme, The Annual celebrates the best in visual communications from the past year, and showcases great work to both peers and potential clients from the wider creative community.

Each year, our panel of industry experts chooses the work that they feel represents the best of the year across advertising, design, digital and music videos, for publication in our special double issue of Creative Review in May.

For more details and to submit your entry, click here

 


Information is Beautiful Awards 2014

Posted: November 16th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration | Comments Off

The winners of this year's Information is Beautiful Awards include a day in the life of a New York taxi, a comparison of selfie styles in five cities, an analysis of rap lyrics and an investigation into refugee movements

Chris Whong's NYC Taxis: A Day in the Life won Gold in Motion Infographics. It visualises taxi trip data from 2013, showing the activities of a single taxi on a single day. Whong obtained data on 170 million taxi trips from the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission. The trips of 30 cabs were analysed for the project. As the data only included the start and end points for each trip, Whong ran the data through Google's Directions API to map the most direct routes for each journey - although these are not necessarily exactly the same routes that the actual taxi took.

 

Gold for Data Visualisation went to Rappers, Sorted by Size of Vocabulary by Matthew Daniels. The piece tries to compare the vocabularies of hip hop artists with each other and with both Shakespeare and Moby Dick. It took the first 35,000 words used by each rapper in their lyrics, the first 5,000 words in seven Shakespeare plays and the first 35,000 words in Moby Dick and looked for how many unique words were used.

 

The Refugee Project by Hyperakt and Ekene Ijeoma won Gold for Interactive. "Working with technologist Ekene Ijeoma, we created an interactive experience that illuminates where and when refugees emigrate, as well as the complex stories of political, social and economic turmoil behind each displacement. By adding historical context to the shifting patterns of forced migration, we highlight the impact each crisis has on people’s lives," say Hyperakt.

Deroy Peraza & Ekene Ijeoma: Visualized Feb 2014 New York from VISUALIZED on Vimeo.

 

In Infographics, RJ Andrews won Gold for Creative Routines. The piece visualises research by writer Mason Currey into how creative people organise their time in order to produce their work. "Some kept to the same disciplined regimen for decades while others locked in patterns only while working on specific works". More here

 

 

Selfiecity by Moritz Stefaner won Gold in the Website category. The project analysed the demographics of people taking selfies, their poses and expressions in five cities. Shown below, for example, is a summary of the poses used by selfie-takers in Bangkok

"In every city we analysed, there are significantly more women selfies than men selfies (from 1.3 times as many in Bangkok to 1.9 times more in Berlin). Moscow is a strong outlier - here, we have 4.6 times more female than male selfies!" the creators say.

 

Sam Slover won the Student category for Wrap Genius: "For 12 weeks, I carefully tracked all of my grocery purchases and created a new visual framework to better understand it all. Where does my food come from? What are my healthiest and unhealthiest choices? Which foods have GMOs? I then created a Web framework that shows me all of this information and more. It's a new type of dream food label, designed for the interests of the consumer."

 

The Community award went to The Rite of Spring by Stephen Malinowski, an animated graphical score of Igor Stravinsky's masterpiece

 

While the prize for the Most Beautiful project went to RAW by Density Design Research Lab, which also won the Tool category.

 

See allthis year's award winners and more about the awards here

 


Information is Beautiful Awards 2014

Posted: November 16th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration | Comments Off

The winners of this year's Information is Beautiful Awards include a day in the life of a New York taxi, a comparison of selfie styles in five cities, an analysis of rap lyrics and an investigation into refugee movements

Chris Whong's NYC Taxis: A Day in the Life won Gold in Motion Infographics. It visualises taxi trip data from 2013, showing the activities of a single taxi on a single day. Whong obtained data on 170 million taxi trips from the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission. The trips of 30 cabs were analysed for the project. As the data only included the start and end points for each trip, Whong ran the data through Google's Directions API to map the most direct routes for each journey - although these are not necessarily exactly the same routes that the actual taxi took.

 

Gold for Data Visualisation went to Rappers, Sorted by Size of Vocabulary by Matthew Daniels. The piece tries to compare the vocabularies of hip hop artists with each other and with both Shakespeare and Moby Dick. It took the first 35,000 words used by each rapper in their lyrics, the first 5,000 words in seven Shakespeare plays and the first 35,000 words in Moby Dick and looked for how many unique words were used.

 

The Refugee Project by Hyperakt and Ekene Ijeoma won Gold for Interactive. "Working with technologist Ekene Ijeoma, we created an interactive experience that illuminates where and when refugees emigrate, as well as the complex stories of political, social and economic turmoil behind each displacement. By adding historical context to the shifting patterns of forced migration, we highlight the impact each crisis has on people’s lives," say Hyperakt.

Deroy Peraza & Ekene Ijeoma: Visualized Feb 2014 New York from VISUALIZED on Vimeo.

 

In Infographics, RJ Andrews won Gold for Creative Routines. The piece visualises research by writer Mason Currey into how creative people organise their time in order to produce their work. "Some kept to the same disciplined regimen for decades while others locked in patterns only while working on specific works". More here

 

 

Selfiecity by Moritz Stefaner won Gold in the Website category. The project analysed the demographics of people taking selfies, their poses and expressions in five cities. Shown below, for example, is a summary of the poses used by selfie-takers in Bangkok

"In every city we analysed, there are significantly more women selfies than men selfies (from 1.3 times as many in Bangkok to 1.9 times more in Berlin). Moscow is a strong outlier - here, we have 4.6 times more female than male selfies!" the creators say.

 

Sam Slover won the Student category for Wrap Genius: "For 12 weeks, I carefully tracked all of my grocery purchases and created a new visual framework to better understand it all. Where does my food come from? What are my healthiest and unhealthiest choices? Which foods have GMOs? I then created a Web framework that shows me all of this information and more. It's a new type of dream food label, designed for the interests of the consumer."

 

The Community award went to The Rite of Spring by Stephen Malinowski, an animated graphical score of Igor Stravinsky's masterpiece

 

While the prize for the Most Beautiful project went to RAW by Density Design Research Lab, which also won the Tool category.

 

See allthis year's award winners and more about the awards here

 


Festival of Marketing 2014: why Airbnb’s rebrand was no disaster

Posted: November 13th, 2014 | Author: Rachael Steven | Filed under: Digital, Graphic Design | Comments Off

Image via DesignStudio, which redesigned Airbnb's visual identity and created a new logo for the brand

The head of Airbnb's art department discussed reactions to the company's recent rebrand at the Festival of Marketing today, describing the public response to its logo as a "pleasant surprise".

Speaking to Design Week editor Angus Montgomery, Schapiro explained the reasons for the company's rebrand, the impact of the new identity on the company's communications and his surprise that it became one of the most talked about design stories of this year.

The lettings website launched its new look designed by London team DesignStudio in July (read our blog post on it here), which saw its original blue and white word marque replaced with the ‘belo', a universal symbol of belonging inspired by the idea of people, pleaces, love and community.

On social media, however, the logo was immediately likened to various body parts – from buttocks to male and female genitals. Within hours, the internet was awash with tumblr sites and memes pointing this out; the subject had trended on Twitter and was featured on mainstream news outlets from CNN to the Guardian and BBC.

Speaking to Montgomery, Schapiro described the social media response as incredible. "We expected it to be relevant and interesting to creatives and marketers," he said.

Asked why the rebrand caused such a fuss, aside from the obvious reasons, Schapiro said: "Most brands are very protective about what you can do with [their assets], so to challenge that notion and create something that's intended to be used and individualised across our community [Airbnb set up a site allowing people to create, download and share their own versions of the belo]... it was very disruptive."

While some media were quick to label the incident as a "disaster", Schapiro says the company was largely unphased by the public's response.

"Surprisingly, it wasn't difficult to deal with," said Schapiro. "[After working on it] for so many months, you'd expect it to be disheartening, but we all felt 100 percent confident that this was the right direction for the brand in the long term. We had to contextualise that [as an] immediate response," he added.

He also said the brand was used to controversy. "That's the nature of Airbnb – the concept of staying in someone's home, opening up yours is such a novel and new idea ... controversy isn't new to us," he explained.

Rather than ignoring the criticism online, Airbnb actively engaged with conversations surrounding the marque, with a social media team creating their own content in response and acknowledging the joke on Twitter.

"The [initial] conversation went on for about two or three days, and we continued with that strategy of responding to the situation," said Schapiro.

Four months on, he didn't mention whether the rebrand has had a significant impact on visits to the site, or transactions made on it, but Schapiro did say it has enabled the company's creative teams to create more engaging content and better share stories about Airbnb members.

To mark the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall last week, for example, it released an animated film and website telling the story of two former border guards on opposing sides of the wall who were re-united after a chance meeting through Airbnb in 2012:

"It started out as a design project, but I have seen it elevate the entire company," he added. "Telling stories, for us, has always been a challenge ... this shift lets us share the message of our community globally."

The Festival of Marketing is a two-day conference organised by Centaur media brands, including Design Week, Econsultancy, Marketing Week, Celebrity Intelligence and CR. For details, see festivalofmarketing.com


Festival of Marketing 2014: How Lego uses social media

Posted: November 12th, 2014 | Author: Rachael Steven | Filed under: Advertising, Digital | Comments Off

Lego's global director of social media Lars Silberbauer gave a talk at the Festival of Marketing in London today explaining how the company uses social media to engage with consumers around the world.

Like most companies, Silbauer said Lego uses social platforms to create value in four ways: to increase sales, improve marketing efficiency, build "brand affinity" and as a damage control tool. With teams based in the UK, both US coasts, Denmark and Shanghai, Silberbauer said the brand aims to deliver content 24/7.

"There's always something happening on social media, and if we're not there [to engage with consumers] someone else will be," he said.

Citing seasonal campaigns such as 2012’s Happy Holliplay (case study below) and one promoting interactive game Life of George, which encouraged customers to build a character and take pictures of him in unusual locations, Silberbauer said Lego’s social content always aims to promote the idea of playing together and appeal to consumer's pride in their creations.

Most of its campaigns on social media encourage customers to share pictures of their own Lego builds, appealing to both adult and child fans, as well as proud parents who like to share photos of their children's creations.

He also highlighted how the company is using the internet to crowd source ideas for new products through its Lego Ideas platform. The site allows Lego fans to upload suggestions for new kits and products and if they get 10,000 votes, the idea is reviewed by Lego designers and marketing staff, with selected ideas put into production.

By building support for the product online before it's made, Silberbauer said the company doesn't need to spend further money marketing goods when they hit stores – "items are usually flying off the shelves," he said.

Although he cited damage control as one of the key functions of Lego's social media, Silberbauer didn't mention the company's handling of Greenpeace's online campaign urging the brand to end its partnership with Shell, but this was perhaps unsurprising, given Lego's stoic silence online during the period.

Pics promoting Lego during Hallowe'en, via Lego on Twitter

The brand released an initial statement online in July, stating it was a matter for Greenpeace and Shell and another in October before confirming it would not renew the partnership but declined to comment further on its site or social media platforms. (Given Greenpeace's aggressive approach to online campaigning and the success of its film and petition, this was probably a wise move).

Silberbauer did discuss other ways that Lego reacts in real time to events, however, mainly through short films and video content posted online, such as a recreation of Felix Baumgartner's jump from the Stratosphere made using space-themed Lego figures, shown below.

It also uses content posted by fans, and sold over $10,000 of merchandise on May 4 by using a fan image of a Star Wars Lego character to promote special offers.

With the brand's social content produced in-house, Silberbauer said staff are required to attend a course, pass an exam and receive a license before posting on behalf of Lego.

Likening social media to dating, he spoke about the importance of building "lasting connections" by not just posting content, but responding to customers, sharing their posts and creating camaigns that encouraged them to think imaginatively while actively engaging with the brand. "You have to be personal and human," he said.

Lars Silberbauer was speaking at the Festival of Marketing, the two-day conference organised by all Centaur's media brands, including Design Week, Econsultancy, Celebrity Intelligence, Marketing week and CR. Details here.


CR November iPad edition

Posted: November 4th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Art, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Photography, Type / Typography | Comments Off

The November issue of CR - our craft special - is also available for iPad, where you'll find all the print mag articles plus exclusive additional content in Hi Res, our showcase gallery section, and CRTV, with video profiles of creative people, animations and other moving image work from around the world....

In Features we feature several contemporary makers from bicycle builders Rusby Cycles, bespoke shoemakers Carreducker and The Brilliant Sign Company, right through to the latest virtual reality with Oculus Rift, Unit9 and Marshmallow Laser Feast. Plus Carter Wong, Erik Spiekermann, reviews of GraphicsRCA: Fifty Years and the British Library's gothic art show, and more. And not forgetting regular columns from Michael Evamy, Daniel Benneworth-Gray and Paul Belford.

In Hi Res you'll find posters from Abram Games; photographer Jonathan Knowles' Eyes series; toy design and graphics from Fredun Shapur; Lydia Goldblatt's Still Here photo series; David Bailey's East End; and Attack of the Giant Fingers found photo series from KesselsKramer.

CRTV includes virtual reality videos from Unit9 and Marshmallow Laser Feast; profiles of wooden textile designer Elisa Strozyk and graphic designer Max Kisman; animation with Chrisoph Steger's Mother and Nathan Campbell's Aqua Profonda, and a vision of Parisian chocolate craftsmanship by Simon Pinchochet.

 

To submit work for consideration for CRTV or Hi Res, please email antonia.wilson@centaur.co.uk

For further info on the CR iPad app or to subscribe, click here.


The crafty one: CR November issue

Posted: October 27th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Art, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Photography, Type / Typography | Comments Off

The November issue of CR is a craft special with features on several contemporary makers: from bicycle builders and bespoke shoemakers, right through to the latest creators of virtual reality...

This issue also features news of CR Club, our subscriber initiative which replaces Monograph. CR Club will offer subscribers exclusive access to events, free gifts and money off a variety of brands. Details of our first exclusive invite-only event, ‘Letterpress @ The RCA' – a talk by the world-renowned typographer, design and letterpress practitioner, Alan Kitching – are here.

Our November issue cover – the text of which is painted onto etched glass – is by Ashley Bishop of The Brilliant Sign Company (see below) and introduces the idea of 'Tradition and Technology'.

And the first stop in our investigation into modern craft is, appropriately enough, the Makers Cafe in London: the first coffee shop to also offer a 3D printing service. Illustration by David Doran.

We then look at how The Partners have worked with illustrator Kristjana S Williams to create an original 3D collage for the capital's Connaught hotel, elements of which are then used over 100 applications in the building, communicating its distinctive brand of heritage and modernity.

Introducing five original documentary films which will be soon be debuting on the CR website, we meet the makers who will be profiled in the series. And while they make everything from jeans and shoes, to cycles, signs and mobile phones, they each share a passion to create the very best in their field.

We talked to Hiut Denim Co:

The Brilliant Sign Company (whose Ashley Bishop created our signwritten cover, top):

Makers of handsewn shoes, Carréducker:

HTC, who design human- and precision-crafted mobile phones:

And Rusby Cycles:

Broadening out the notion of craft into the cutting edge of the digital world, Eliza Williams talks to some of the leading proponents of virtual reality, including Oculus Rift, Marshmallow Laser Feast and Unit9.

And finally in our craft section, what happens when great craft skills are mixed with great ideas? Studio Carter Wong know fully well as they've been working like this for thirty years: to celebrate their anniversary, they took us through ten of their favourite projects.

In other features we have a seven-page visual feast of graphic design from the forthcoming GraphicsRCA: Fifty Years show which opens at The Royal College of Art next month and celebrates the great work produced by the college's students over the past fifty years.

And talking of longevity, we also look at the career of Erik Spiekermann – alongside our timeline of his life and work, we republish a fantastic interview with the designer and typographer which appears in a new book dedicated to his craft: Hello, I Am Erik, out now from Gestalten.

In Crit, Rachael Steven attends the second Modern Magazine conference, while Rick Poynor enjoys the thrill of an exhibition dedicated entirely to the Gothic at the British Library.

And in reverse formation, the front section of this month's issue sees Daniel Benneworth-Gray attempting to navigate the York Book Fair without causing any lasting damage; while Michael Evamy looks at the various identity projects which have graced the World Trade Center, pre and post-9/11.

This issue also features news of CR Club, our subscriber initiative which replaces Monograph. CR Club will offer subscribers exclusive access to events, free gifts and money off a variety of brands. Details of our first exclusive invite-only event, ‘Letterpress @ The RCA' – a talk by the world-renowned typographer, design and letterpress practitioner, Alan Kitching – are here.

If you are not already a CR subscriber, you can find out about our various subscriber packages, here.