We're through creative a branding and digital agency from Macclesfield near Manchester. We've put together this site to create a source of inspiration, we hope you like it.

CR January issue: Feat. FKA twigs

Posted: December 17th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Art, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Photography, Type / Typography | Comments Off

"I don't want to be a pop star, I just love making things." An interview with the multitalented FKA twigs is the lead feature in our January Music special issue

Our new issue marks the beginning of an extension of our editorial coverage which we will be rolling out over the coming year. During the summer we carried out some major audience research which, thankfully, tied in with some of our own thinking about how to make CR more relevant, more valuable and, we hope, more interesting.

There are creative directors and creative (or design) departments in all sorts of organisations today, from broadcasters to banks, healthcare providers to sports teams. We want to link that creative community up, becoming a platform for celebrating creativity in all its forms and examining the value it brings.

For each issue of the magazine, we will be looking at a distinct sector and asking the question: "how is creativity changing this world?". Each issue will investigate key trends, highlight key innovations and individuals and discuss the impact of new thinking, new technology and new approaches. So alongside pieces on designers or creatives, you will find interviews with chefs or architects, dancers, scriptwriters and composers. We will continue to speak to people running design studios and ad agencies, but we will add to that people running theatre groups, or broadcasters, hospitals or universities – wherever creativity is making a difference.

That doesn't mean that we will be abandoning our heartland of visual communications, more that we are reflecting the fact that inspiration now comes from multiple sources, silos are breaking down and that the studio/agency world does not have a monopoly on creativity. We will still be writing about visual communication, but we will add other forms of creativity to the mix.

We start with music. Future issues will look at food and drink, health, entertainment, education and a host of other sectors where creativity is making its mark.

 

We caught up with twigs as she embarks on a directing career through Academy and talked to her about what it means to be a young artist in the music industry today

 

Our regular columnists also pick up on the music theme: Daniel Benneworth-Gray wonders whether it is ever acceptable to treat album sleeves as art while Michael Evamy delves into the design history of one of the UK's most important labels: 2 Tone. Plus, Nick Asbury looks at the revival of the jingle and meets one of the masters of the genre.

 

In the age of the digital download, what is the role of the physical object in music packaging? asks Tim Milne.

 

 

Could brand guidelines be extended to include music too?

 

 

Why and how band Wild Beasts created a graphic novel using gifs

 

 

Rachael Steven talks to Jack Featherstone and Hans Lo about how the graphics and live visuals for Simian Mobile Disco's Whorl are derived from the music itself

 

And Rachael also talks to Warp about how design and great A&R have been at the heart of the label's success

 

Antonia Wilson meets Bestival creative director Josie da Bank

 

Film composer Jim Williams talks to Mark Sinclair about the role of music in telling the dark tales of director Ben Wheatley

 

 

Alasdair Scott compares the UI/UX of leading streaming devices and services

 

Rachael Steven reports on the explosion of innovation around live gigs

And, finally, in our Crit section, Rick Poynor reviews a welcome new history of Californian graphic design

 

The best way to get this and every issue of CR is to subscribe, which you can do here. We are currently running a special Christmas Challenge: share your unique 20% discount code (which you can get here) and you could win £1000. The code gives 20% off all Creative Review subscriptions (UK and overseas) until the end of the year. It can be used by as many people as you like, so everyone you share it with can also benefit. You don't have to be an existing subscriber - it's open to everyone.

We will be totting up all the times that a particular code was used to buy a subscription. At the end of December, the code that was used for the most new subscriptions will win its owner £1000. More details here


Music Videos of the Month

Posted: December 16th, 2014 | Author: Eliza Williams | Filed under: Music Video / Film | Comments Off

We have treats from Panda Bear, Clark, Diagram, Tourist, and Bastille Vs. Grades to share with you this month, but to kick things off, here's Guy Pearce as you've never quite seen him before...

Directed by Tim White, this video, which is for Pearce's song Fly All The Way, sees the actor in manic form, taking on various themes of modern life – including society's obsession with youth and beauty – through a spoof of crappy TV infomercials. Production company: Plot Media.

There's been some lovely animated promos released this month. First up is this video for Panda Bear, for new track Boys Latin. Directed by Isaiah Saxon and Sean Hellfritsch (of Encyclopedia Pictura fame), it is a beautiful journey across land and sea. Production company: Ghost Robot.

Our second animated piece comes from directing team Persistent Peril and is for the track Phantom Power by Diagram. The video tells the story of a broken-hearted man who goes into the woods to reflect on his relationship. Illustration: Garth Jones; Animation: Garth Jones, Mark Billington, Ginny Jones.

Our final animation this month is a graphics influenced piece by director Nicolas Ménard, created for Tourist's track Illuminate. Production company: Nexus.

Next up is a dark and hypnotic film from director Chris Hewitt, which provides the perfect accompaniment to the track Winter Linn by Clark. Production company: Knucklehead.

We finish this month's selection with a film for the track Torn Apart by Bastille Vs. Grades, which muses upon the nature of love. As it is directed Keith Schofield though, it is anything but schmaltzy, and is instead weird, unexpected and very funny. Production company: Caviar.


Beyond the record sleeve

Posted: December 16th, 2014 | Author: Simon Moore | Filed under: Advertising, Digital, Graphic Design, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

Despite the doom and gloom about the death of the record sleeve, Simon Moore says there's never been a more creatively exciting time for a designer to work in music


I was lucky enough to know, from a pretty early age, exactly what I wanted to do for a career. For me, this was as a result of being  told I was the worst student of music in my teacher's entire 30 year professional life, and then, days later, picking up the Mark Farrow designed Pet Shop Boys album ‘Introspective' (above). With traditional art skills only marginally superior to my musical ones, evidenced by a never-ending output of disturbingly incompetent portraits and sculptures that looked like the work of a broken sausage machine, I had long since given up on doing anything with my life that involved either of my two academic interests.

But once I got my hands on that 12" slab of geometric technicolour beauty, something clicked. Here was an object that looked incredible put out by my favourite band; music and art combining into something greater than the sum of its parts. I still remember the pop of clarity in my befuddled 13 year old brain as I realised that this was what I wanted to do with my life.

 

Detail from 1992 T-shirt for The Orb by TDR

 

Suddenly my schoolbooks became littered with hand-drawn band logos, and then, via similar synaesthetic crushes on Peter Saville/ New Order, The Designers Republic / The Orb and Tomato /Underworld, I ended up, like an incurable geek, in the Liverpool Street branch of Our Price in 1999, taking endless photos of the very first CD I'd designed sitting proudly, but with negligible aesthetic appeal, in the rack reserved for number ones.

In the intervening years, the music industry has provided me with the backbone of my clients. But in that time the impact of a new digital landscape has radically reshaped not just the music industry itself, but its relationship to design. The perceived wisdom seems to be that falling revenues from sales have necessitated brutal cuts to creative budgets, resulting in lower quality work. And the obsolescence of physical product, replaced by miniscule pixelbased packshots, negates the need for subtlety or imagination in their design.

In fact, to talk to many people today you'd think that design for music has become a creative void, populated by disinterested, dead-eyed clients paying peanuts to disinterested, dead-eyed designers, churning out soulless, functional rubbish to customers who don't give a shit. It's an opinion that rankles as I believe it's incorrect and unfair. There is in fact some excellent, progressive and genuinely creative work being produced for music clients as a direct result of the requirements of this digital age, not in spite of it.

Personally, I think this general negativity is because people's attention is still very much fixed on CDs and vinyl: the physical products traditionally the centrepiece of a creative campaign which are being produced in increasingly fewer numbers. In fact, whenever design for music is mentioned these days it still tends to be centred around some lavish, short-run packaging for an unknown band or barrel-scraping rock dinosaur. And while these can be undeniably beautiful objects, they also seem a little pointless: vanity projects or anachronistic trinkets. Sort of like a Tom Dixon designed fax machine.

As my introductory ramble hopefully illustrates, the affection I hold for those decorated squares of paper and card is a strong as anyone's, but the world, and especially the music industry has moved on - whether we like it or not. Wistful pining for a defunct era is at best a waste of time and at worst counter-productive, like yearning for that ex-girlfriend who will never take you back. In short, all that's happened is the parameters have changed, and design, as a commercial enterprise, is surely all about understanding and working within parameters.

Whereas previously you could win a pitch with some nice logo designs and shoot references, the scope for a designer in this area is now broader and less formulaic. The album or single cover is no longer the sun around which everything else orbits. I now often work with labels on a central construct for their artists, something that goes beyond just some nice imagery, but runs deeper and more fundamentally. Identifying what makes each artist or campaign different, and communicating that message across a range of channels, of more equalised importance, imbuing everything with different elements from within the same visual language, not just an endless re-purposing of the same cover design.

 

Image: vivacoldplay

 

The first time I saw this in full effect was the Mylo Xyloto campaign by Tappin Gofton for Coldplay, wherein the album design was part of a wider creative strategy that had all kinds of executions, physical, digital and experiential that held together consistently throughout. It felt modern and relevant in a way the traditional "3 singles and an album" approach no longer did. Increasingly, labels and their artists are seeing themselves as brands, which is a horribly overused word, but there's a logic to it here. In our visually-saturated world, the need for an artist's live shows, public appearances, fan-engagement, products, styling, digital presence and graphics to integrate coherently is more important than ever.

 

Atoms for Peace Drawing Room pop-up gallery featuring Stanley Donwood's artwork for the album. The campaign also included bespoke social media artwork by Glitchr, and graffiti by INSA (see top, below and our story here).  Image: The Quietus.


 

Shifting the sights to think of music more as an all-encompassing experience as opposed to simply a product therefore provides more
opportunity than ever for the willing creative mind. The number of different creatives now working within music is wider than I can ever remember, with younger, fresher talent now given more of a chance to produce exciting work for passionate and open-minded clients, at the expense of more costly, established studios. There's also been a pleasing focus on clarity within design, and the need to communicate across small and large sizes has seen the use of typography, especially, come to the fore, whether that be the bespoke experimentalism of Kate Moross (Wild Beasts video below) or brutal elegance of Trevor Jackson.

 

On 25 February 2015, Trevor Jackson will release F O R M A T as, initially, a limited edition consisting of 12 different musical formats each containing a separate track. A collected vinyl edition and digital versions will follow shortly after, all on The Vinyl Factory. More here

 

Wild Beasts - Mecca from StudioMoross on Vimeo.

 

 

From time-to-time I wonder whether a new generation of designers will be inspired by music to divert their life's path as I once was, but one look at the extremely vocal responses to new artwork on social media, the number of teenagers producing versions of their favourite singers' latest design, or the high take-up of fan engagement in projects like this suggests that music and creative work are as compelling a partnership as ever for this demographic, despite most of them probably never having owned a CD, let alone a piece of vinyl, in their entire lives.

Simon Moore is founder of creative agency Baby. See our profile here

 


Creative Review's January 2015 issue is a Music special, featuring FKA twigs, Bestival creative director Josie da Bank, film composer Jim Williams and more

 


Beyond the record sleeve

Posted: December 16th, 2014 | Author: Simon Moore | Filed under: Advertising, Digital, Graphic Design, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

Despite the doom and gloom about the death of the record sleeve, Simon Moore says there's never been a more creatively exciting time for a designer to work in music


I was lucky enough to know, from a pretty early age, exactly what I wanted to do for a career. For me, this was as a result of being  told I was the worst student of music in my teacher's entire 30 year professional life, and then, days later, picking up the Mark Farrow designed Pet Shop Boys album ‘Introspective' (above). With traditional art skills only marginally superior to my musical ones, evidenced by a never-ending output of disturbingly incompetent portraits and sculptures that looked like the work of a broken sausage machine, I had long since given up on doing anything with my life that involved either of my two academic interests.

But once I got my hands on that 12" slab of geometric technicolour beauty, something clicked. Here was an object that looked incredible put out by my favourite band; music and art combining into something greater than the sum of its parts. I still remember the pop of clarity in my befuddled 13 year old brain as I realised that this was what I wanted to do with my life.

 

Detail from 1992 T-shirt for The Orb by TDR

 

Suddenly my schoolbooks became littered with hand-drawn band logos, and then, via similar synaesthetic crushes on Peter Saville/ New Order, The Designers Republic / The Orb and Tomato /Underworld, I ended up, like an incurable geek, in the Liverpool Street branch of Our Price in 1999, taking endless photos of the very first CD I'd designed sitting proudly, but with negligible aesthetic appeal, in the rack reserved for number ones.

In the intervening years, the music industry has provided me with the backbone of my clients. But in that time the impact of a new digital landscape has radically reshaped not just the music industry itself, but its relationship to design. The perceived wisdom seems to be that falling revenues from sales have necessitated brutal cuts to creative budgets, resulting in lower quality work. And the obsolescence of physical product, replaced by miniscule pixelbased packshots, negates the need for subtlety or imagination in their design.

In fact, to talk to many people today you'd think that design for music has become a creative void, populated by disinterested, dead-eyed clients paying peanuts to disinterested, dead-eyed designers, churning out soulless, functional rubbish to customers who don't give a shit. It's an opinion that rankles as I believe it's incorrect and unfair. There is in fact some excellent, progressive and genuinely creative work being produced for music clients as a direct result of the requirements of this digital age, not in spite of it.

Personally, I think this general negativity is because people's attention is still very much fixed on CDs and vinyl: the physical products traditionally the centrepiece of a creative campaign which are being produced in increasingly fewer numbers. In fact, whenever design for music is mentioned these days it still tends to be centred around some lavish, short-run packaging for an unknown band or barrel-scraping rock dinosaur. And while these can be undeniably beautiful objects, they also seem a little pointless: vanity projects or anachronistic trinkets. Sort of like a Tom Dixon designed fax machine.

As my introductory ramble hopefully illustrates, the affection I hold for those decorated squares of paper and card is a strong as anyone's, but the world, and especially the music industry has moved on - whether we like it or not. Wistful pining for a defunct era is at best a waste of time and at worst counter-productive, like yearning for that ex-girlfriend who will never take you back. In short, all that's happened is the parameters have changed, and design, as a commercial enterprise, is surely all about understanding and working within parameters.

Whereas previously you could win a pitch with some nice logo designs and shoot references, the scope for a designer in this area is now broader and less formulaic. The album or single cover is no longer the sun around which everything else orbits. I now often work with labels on a central construct for their artists, something that goes beyond just some nice imagery, but runs deeper and more fundamentally. Identifying what makes each artist or campaign different, and communicating that message across a range of channels, of more equalised importance, imbuing everything with different elements from within the same visual language, not just an endless re-purposing of the same cover design.

 

Image: vivacoldplay

 

The first time I saw this in full effect was the Mylo Xyloto campaign by Tappin Gofton for Coldplay, wherein the album design was part of a wider creative strategy that had all kinds of executions, physical, digital and experiential that held together consistently throughout. It felt modern and relevant in a way the traditional "3 singles and an album" approach no longer did. Increasingly, labels and their artists are seeing themselves as brands, which is a horribly overused word, but there's a logic to it here. In our visually-saturated world, the need for an artist's live shows, public appearances, fan-engagement, products, styling, digital presence and graphics to integrate coherently is more important than ever.

 

Atoms for Peace Drawing Room pop-up gallery featuring Stanley Donwood's artwork for the album. The campaign also included bespoke social media artwork by Glitchr, and graffiti by INSA (see top, below and our story here).  Image: The Quietus.


 

Shifting the sights to think of music more as an all-encompassing experience as opposed to simply a product therefore provides more
opportunity than ever for the willing creative mind. The number of different creatives now working within music is wider than I can ever remember, with younger, fresher talent now given more of a chance to produce exciting work for passionate and open-minded clients, at the expense of more costly, established studios. There's also been a pleasing focus on clarity within design, and the need to communicate across small and large sizes has seen the use of typography, especially, come to the fore, whether that be the bespoke experimentalism of Kate Moross (Wild Beasts video below) or brutal elegance of Trevor Jackson.

 

On 25 February 2015, Trevor Jackson will release F O R M A T as, initially, a limited edition consisting of 12 different musical formats each containing a separate track. A collected vinyl edition and digital versions will follow shortly after, all on The Vinyl Factory. More here

 

Wild Beasts - Mecca from StudioMoross on Vimeo.

 

 

From time-to-time I wonder whether a new generation of designers will be inspired by music to divert their life's path as I once was, but one look at the extremely vocal responses to new artwork on social media, the number of teenagers producing versions of their favourite singers' latest design, or the high take-up of fan engagement in projects like this suggests that music and creative work are as compelling a partnership as ever for this demographic, despite most of them probably never having owned a CD, let alone a piece of vinyl, in their entire lives.

Simon Moore is founder of creative agency Baby. See our profile here

 


Creative Review's January 2015 issue is a Music special, featuring FKA twigs, Bestival creative director Josie da Bank, film composer Jim Williams and more

 


CR Annual: extended deadline

Posted: December 15th, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Digital, Graphic Design, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Type / Typography | Comments Off

There's still time to enter the Creative Review Annual, our showcase of the best work of the year in visual communications. Extended deadline: January 23

Make the most of the extra time and enter your work to be showcased in front of over 1,000,000 members of the global Creative Review audience.

Every year The Annual graces desks at some of the finest creative agencies, studios and brands in the world. It features exceptional work from the biggest names to the latest up-and-comers. This is your chance to put your name in the book.

Enter your work at creativereview.co.uk/annual and you could:

❑ Enhance your profile, impress current clients, and win new ones by getting your work published in one of the industry's leading titles.

❑ Gain independent recognition from the industry as one of the
best in your field.

❑ Ensure your hard work is celebrated in this annual showcase of
the best work in advertising, design and visual culture.

❑ Put your work in front of the UK's leading clients via our case study database of winning work.

Visit creativereview.co.uk/annual to find out full details on how to enter

 


Viktoria Modesta fronts new Born Risky campaign for C4

Posted: December 12th, 2014 | Author: Mark Sinclair | Filed under: Art, Digital, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

As part of Channel 4's ongoing Born Risky campaign, a new promo for singer Viktoria Modesta will be aired during the final of ITV's The X Factor this Sunday. Aimed as a stylish antidote to the ideals of the modern pop world, Modesta's prosthetic leg is a difference that C4 hopes will challenge viewer's perceptions...

Modesta was born in the USSR and suffered damage to her left leg at birth; aged 12 she and her family moved to London and at 20 she made the decision to undergo a below-the-knee amputation which would improve her mobility. Since then she has worked as a model, artist and musician (her EP1 was released in 2010) and performed at the closing ceremony of the Paralympic Games in London in 2012.

"Pop stars these days are painfully dull and manufactured," says Chris Bovill of C4's creative agency, 4Creative. "[Viktoria] is the perfect partner for Born Risky and Channel 4 as she embodies our governmental remit of championing alternative voices and establishing new talent."

The video for the track Prototype – the six-minute film version is shown below – forms the latest in 4Creative's campaign to challenge stereotypes. In 2012, it launched the stirring Paralympics campaign, Meet the Superhumans, and also worked with ‘bearlesque' act Fred Bear in creating the song Gay Mountain that wished athletes good luck at the start of the Sochi Winter Games in Russia.

 

According to Modesta, the new video has given her the chance to express some of her more extreme ideas and continue in her fight against being categorised. Along with the video's director, Saam Farahmand, Modesta achieved these aims with the help of Sophie de Oliveira Barata at The Alternative Limb Project – a fascinating venture which creates bespoke, often highly artistic, prosthetic limbs for clients.

In the 'making of' film, shown below, de Oliveira Barata explains how she created two bespoke limbs for Modesta – one that lights up and has an exposed mechanism (see above), and another that is essentially an elegant spike which Modesta equates to a kind of power dressing.

The latter design appears towards the end of the Prototype film in a sequence that brilliantly combines dance, colour and sound design to dramatic effect.

"For a long time, pop culture closed its doors on me as an amputee and alternative artist," Modesta explains. "I think people have always found it hard to know what to think or feel about an amputee who wasn't trying to be an Olympian."

 

"In sports, ‘overcoming' a disability makes you a hero, but in pop there is no place for these feelings," she adds. "I have never felt comfortable thinking of myself as disabled and this has inspired me to actively challenge old-fashioned views and create a platform in mainstream pop-culture, with other artists, where I have always known I belonged. The time for boring ethical discussions around disability is over. It's only through feelings of admiration, aspiration, curiosity and envy that we can move forward."

Director Farahmand was keen that Modesta also be shown in the film without her prosthetic limb and believes that the new video challenges many conventions. "Like Viktoria, it bores me that the only way an amputee can be relevant is to achieve something that people easily understand," he says. "Culture currently dictates that we view disability from a position of wholesome admiration and empathy."

The 'making of' Prototype film is below. A version of the Prototype video (above) will screen in an ad break during The X Factor final this Sunday night on ITV (in the UK). See viktoriamodesta.com

4Creative
Creative Heads: Chris Bovill & John Allison
Group Business Director: Olivia Browne
Exec & 4 Creative Producer: Miketta Lane
Producer: Nicola Brown

Video Production
Production Company: Rogue Films
Director: Saam Farahmand
Rogue Producer: Kate Hitchings

Music Production
Music Director: Pitch & Sync
Written by Roy Kerr, Hero and Viktoria Modesta

Making Of
Director - Liz Unna
Producer - Amy James
Production Company - HSI London


At home with Michael Wolff

Posted: December 8th, 2014 | Author: Rachael Steven | Filed under: Graphic Design, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

The latest issue of YCN's members' magazine features an interview with Wolff Olins co-founder Michael Wolff. To accompany the article, YCN has also released a short film shot at the designer's home in North London...

Directed by Ed Andrews, the film features a glimpse of Wolff's home studio and some of the artworks and artefacts he has collected over the years, from a leopard created by collage artist Peter Clark to a 1966 cover of Paris' Match magazine commemorating the death of Walt Disney, and a head and hand of Frank Spencer by sculptor Wilfrid Wood.

He also offers some words of wisdom for designers and reflects on the importance of creating design with real purpose and value: "It's very easy as a designer to think what you like is what's right but actually, what's right is more important than what you think is right", he says, adding: "If [design] doesn't bring joy, if it doesn't satisfy people in some way or delight them, or improve the quality of their lives, I can't see the point of it."

The film accompanies an interview written by Sarah Snaith and published in the Winter Issue of YCN's magazine, in which Wolff reflects on lessons learned from 50 years designing communications for clients. Snaith's article is featured alongside a photoshoot with Wolff, shot by photographer Nick Ballon in Regent's Park:

Also in the issue, designed and art directed by Alex Hunting, is a look at four studio partnerships, including A Practice for Everyday Life's co-founders Emma Thomas and Kirsty Carter as well as Stefan Sagmeister and Jessica Walsh and an article on Ballon's latest project documenting some extraordinary architecture in the Bolivian city El Alto, plus illustrations by Alice Bowsher, La Tigre, Jordy van den Nieuwendijk and Joe Cruz.

“Those big buildings, you know, they look like some of the miniatures we used to make years ago. Who knows, maybe the people who own them have been faithful to the Ekeko and have asked for their houses to be built just like that.” - Don Ruben

The Ekeko is the Andean god of all small things bringing abundance and prosperity to those with enough faith.

El Alto is a Bolivian city that is slowly creating its own identity. The city’s growth can be seen as the product of mass migration from rural and mining regions following the crisis that arose after Bolivia’s neoliberal reforms in the 80’s and 90’s. The city’s inhabitance are largely made up of indigenous Aymara people. With these populations undergoing a rapid urbanisation process, it is not surprising to find their architecture conveys their history and culture, as well as their quest to establish a hybrid identity, which is true to their roots yet adapted to their modernised setting.

Adapted text by Amaru Villanueva Rance
Still-life models photographed by Jonathan Minster

- See more at: http://www.nickballon.com/index.php/portfolio/story/projects/el_alto_for_youcannow_magazine#sthash.JfQ3hsbt.dpuf

For details or to order a copy (priced at £6) see ycn.org


CR December: The Photography Annual – iPad edition

Posted: December 3rd, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Art, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Photography, Type / Typography | Comments Off

The CR Photography Annual, our double issue for December, is also available for iPad, where you'll find the Best in Book and all of the successful submissions, plus the print mag articles and exclusive additional content in Hi Res, our showcase gallery section, and CRTV, with video profiles of creative people, animations and other moving image work from around the world....

 

The CR Photography Annual features the best in editorial, advertising, fashion, stock and personal work with some fantastic imagery from a wide range of experienced practitioners and relative newcomers.

Also in the Features this month, a look at Vince Frost's new self help book Design Your Life; our investigation into designing for an ageing population; native advertising; illustrator Jean Jullien; photographer Sophie Ebrard; and 'exploration house' The Unseen who combine art and chemistry to create interactive clothing. Plus a look at a political poster conference at Manchester's People's History Museum  and Alan Fletcher's type only posters; and not forgetting regular columns from Michael Evamy, Daniel Benneworth-Gray and Paul Belford.

In Hi Res you'll find category galleries for all the successful submissions for the CR Photography Annual 2014; posters from the BFI national archive celebrating its sci-fi season; Paddy Summerfield's moving photo series Mother and Father; classic pieces from the Illustration Cupboard's winter show; and Laura Stevens' cinematic photo series Another November.

CRTV includes a little film about Jean Jullien by Handsome Frank; the story of the Woolmark production process from CG animation specialists Neon; the making of Harrods Christmas ad; Unit Editions talk with Ken Garland; A profile of glass-plate photographer Brian Gaberman; interviews from the key speakers at this years Modern Magazine Conference; and an amusing animated chicken from Max Halley.

 

To submit work for consideration for CRTV or Hi Res, please email antonia.wilson@centaur.co.uk

For further info on the CR iPad app or to subscribe, click here.


An interactive performance by Africa Express at Tate Modern

Posted: December 2nd, 2014 | Author: Eliza Williams | Filed under: Art, Digital, Music Video / Film | Comments Off

A new collaboration between Tate Modern, Africa Express and website The Space offers viewers a unique opportunity to interact with a performance by Africa Express and explore Tate Modern's galleries by night...

The interactive film has been created to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Terry Riley's composition In C. It features a new interpretation of the work, performed live at Tate Modern in London by musicians brought together by Africa Express and led by classical conductor André de Ridder. Shot on multiple cameras, viewers can interact with the performance online, isolating individual musicians, for example, or focusing on notes played by particular instruments.

In C is often cited as the first minimalist composition, so to accompany the music, audiences are also invited to explore footage of the Tate's collection of minimalist artworks, including pieces by Donald Judd and Frank Stella, filmed at night. In addition, there is also footage of Africa Express and de Ridder recorded in Bamako, Mali, to play with.

The film, which is online here, uses Interlude technology (also featured in Bob Dylan's brilliant interactive film for Like A Rolling Stone, released last year), which allows viewers to choose their own pathway through the work, focusing on the art, or the music, or a bit of both, by pressing simple buttons on screen.

As well as being fun to interact with, the piece demonstrates how complicated artistic concepts such as minimalism can be brought to life for audiences online in unexpected ways, and in the process potentially be made more accessible. We've seen musicians use multiple cameras to film performances before (Beck's Hello Again, for example) and while it is fun to be able to zoom in on instruments and play with the music, it's this film's combination with art – and the setting of Tate Modern – that makes it feel really special, offering a hint of how armchair concert and gallery-going may evolve in the future.

thespace.org


CR December: The Photography Annual

Posted: November 21st, 2014 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Books, Digital, Graphic Design, Illustration, Magazine / Newspaper, Music Video / Film, Photography, Type / Typography | Comments Off

December's CR is a double issue and features our Photography Annual; 80-pages of the best in editorial, advertising, fashion, stock and personal work...

This year's Photography Annual (in association with Precision Printing) includes some fantastic imagery from a wide range of experienced practitioners and relative newcomers. We launched the special issue last night at the Design Museum and were able to celebrate the achievements of those whose work is featured in its pages and the seven projects which were judged Best in Book. Congratulations to all.

Flip the issue over, and up front in the regular CR half we look at how Precision Printing worked to produce this year's Photography Annual cover; take a look at the best of this year's Christmas ads; and look at the Barry Island climbing wall which doubles as an art installation. We also have Bagpuss as we 'almost' new him.

In the columns, Daniel Benneworth-Gray struggles to cope with two new demanding clients in his life – a poorly wife and child; while in Logo Log, Michael Evamy explores the power of punctuation in branding – on the back of the NSPCC's recent logo redesign.

Kicking off our main features, Patrick Burgoyne talks to designer Vince Frost about his new self-helf book, Design Your Life. In it Frost explains how the same design principles which work for clients can be applied to making our personal lives better.

 

Patrick also investigates the social and political challenges that our ageing populations pose to Western economies – and looks at the opportunities that might arise, too.

Eliza Williams examines a year in which native advertising established itself as a controversial presence in our media landscape...

...and in using materials that change colour in the wind – or even react to brain activity – Rachael Steven talks to The Unseen, an 'exploration house' effortlessly combining art and chemistry.

French graphic designer and illustrator Jean Jullien is much in-demand at the moment and Mark Sinclair talks to him about his work to date as he leaves his adopted home of London for New York.

 

Five years ago, Sophie Ebrand swapped life as an advertising account manager for that of a professional photographer – and she's never looked back. Eliza Williams meets her.

In Crit, Jean Grogan attends a Paris conference on the work of type designer, artist and ad man Roger Excoffon, whose work is enjoying something of a revival at the moment...

... and Craig Oldham is also conference bound – to Manchester's People's History Museum for an event dedicated to the history of the political poster in Britain.

Finally, Paul Belford celebrates a type-only poster designed by the late Alan Fletcher which proves that working counter-intuitively can pay off in a big way.