We're through creative a branding and digital agency from Macclesfield near Manchester. We've put together this site to create a source of inspiration, we hope you like it.

Jasper Goodhall

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: James Griffin | Filed under: Art, Illustration | Comments Off

Havn’t visited the site of the talented Jasper Goodhall in a while. He has some really nice new projects up.

Five Deities from jasper goodall on Vimeo.


Graffiti room

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: James Griffin | Filed under: Art, Design | Comments Off

Spotted this sweet Graffiti based installation over at Design Taxi. An artist has painted half the room with graffiti and the other half in contrasting white.


Alex Dujet

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: BOB | Filed under: Design | Comments Off Geneva based Alex Dujet emailed in, another designer who also happens to be new to Original-Linkage.

The Fat Duck anticipation project

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: Gavin Lucas | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

Those lucky enough to be looking forward to a visit to Heston Blumenthal's world-famous Fat Duck restaurant will now, approximately one month before their booking, be offered access to an online location for an exclusive anticipatory experience…

The project, based on Blumenthal's brief that the experience should evoke a kind of "kid in a sweetshop" joy, has actually been in development for four years, but is now finally finished and takes the form of a four minute animation and a binaural experience that lasts a further 3-5 minutes.

While the only way to enjoy the full anticipatory experience is to actually book a meal at The Fat Duck, The Neighbourhood in Manchester (which has been working on the project for four years) has made a making-of film that showcases clips from the animation and explains how the piece functions.

Like A Kid In A Sweet Shop. from The Neighbourhood on Vimeo.

"Most of the timeline of the project has been about the discussion of  ideas and approaches with Heston and his team," explains Jon Humphreys, creative director at The Neighbourhood who worked on the animation.

"At the beginning of the project we were asked to create a 3D animation of a sweetshop interior," continues Humphreys, "and little by little we turned that idea around to creating a rich visual journey to the sweetshop then exploring the interior through sound. Along that path we have discussed many ideas that never made it into the final approach including expolorations into the psychology of magic and illusion! The actual production time of the animation was about eight weeks in total."

The Neighbourhood worked with Manchester-based LOVE on the sound experience and it was LOVE that wrote the script for a narration provided by actor John Hurt. LOVE also built the system to integrate the experience into The Fat Duck's online reservation system, while London-based Zelig worked with the visual agencies on the binaural sound for the project.

"The animation is not designed to be interactive in itself," adds Humphreys, "but part of a customer journey to the Fat Duck. When the animation finishes you are given the option to view again. Diners will have four chances to view the animation in the 12 weeks before arriving to eat at the restaurant, the idea being that people pick up on visual and audio cues in the film that they will discover at the restaurant.



"We have also developed another component to the experience that is interactive – an augmented reality sweetshop designed as a 'digital souvenir' to be discovered after the meal via a card placed in the bag of sweets Heston gives to his customers before they leave."

thefatduck.co.uk

CR in Print

Thanks for visiting the CR website, but if you are not also reading CR in print you're missing out. Our March issue is an illustration special with features on Clifford Richards, Pick Me Up, the relationship between illustrators and writers, the making of the cover of the New York Times Magazine and a powerful essay by Lawrence Zeegen calling on illustrators to become more engaged with the wider world and accusing the profession of withdrawing "from the big debates of our society to focus on the chit-chat and tittle-tattle of inner-sanctum nothingness".

The best way to make sure you receive CR in print every month is to subscribe – you will also save money and receive our award-winning Monograph booklet every month. You can do so here.


Max Parsons and Jack Featherstone: Loop

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: Bryony Quinn | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

Small

We are big fans of this strange and very lovely photographic series by Max Parsons and Jack Featherstone, Of course we’ve seen time-lapse photography before, but in the exact same way food always tastes better if someone else has made it, in the deft hands of these two young designers, the effect is beautifully realised in a series of ambiguous black and white experiments. Continuing the happy success of collaboration, both designers will be exhibiting at The Frontroom in Cambridge with their show Template from March 18. (Read more)

www.maxedmundparsons.co.uk
www.jackfeatherstone.co.uk


RSS Sponsorship Now Available

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: Antonio Carusone | Filed under: Sponsors, sponsorship | Comments Off

Week-long exclusive sponsorships for AisleOne’s syndicated RSS feed are now available. This is a great way to promote your product, service, or company.

Sponsorship price is $300 and includes:

  • A readership of 10,000 RSS Subscribers, 135,000+ monthly page views and 17,100+ Twitter followers.
  • Exclusive week-long sponsorship.
  • A promotional post at the start of the week. This will appear on the site, and in the RSS Feed. The promo will also live permanently in the site archives.
  • A tweet will be sent out at the start of the week.

Head over to the Sponsorship page to see which weeks are available.

Email me to schedule an exclusive sponsorship or for more information.

To The Readers

I know promos can suck, but it does cost a bit to keep this site going. So what does this mean? Once a week a short, single post will be made promoting something that makes sense to you, and to this blog. So you will not see a promo for motor oil. It will be something relevant to you: designers, artists, photographers, architects and creatives. The posts will be clearly marked, so if you choose to ignore it, you can. They will be very unobtrusive, just text with no images. If you have any feedback on how the promos should be displayed, let me know.


Present Plus: One Minute Wonder

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: Rob Alderson | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

Pp

The so-called MTV generation gets an unfair press, with the designation used as a damning shorthand for those whose attention spans have been decimated by the channel’s perceived dilettantism. But, yeah anyway, what was I saying? Oh right, well actually I believe it means we are able to process information much more quickly and this project from Present Plus realises that you can do a lot in a short period of time. The One Minute Wonder videos feature trend watchers, internet entrepreneurs and artists talking about their work in a pleasingly snappy way, and like an excellent date they’re interesting and easy on the eye. We like.

www.vimeo.com/presentplus


How 30 Great Ads Were Made

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Books | Comments Off

Published today by Laurence King Publishers is How 30 Great Ads Were Made: From Idea To Campaign, a new book by CR's Eliza Williams. The book takes readers behind the scenes of 30 of the last decade's most successful ad campaigns...

Featuring interviews with the key creatives, directors and clients for each campaign, the book offers an insight into how great ad campaigns get made, along with some surprising facts about some of the most popular ads of recent times: for example, did you know that the children's brows in the Cadbury's Eyebrows spot were manipulated by puppeteers rather than CGI? See the pic above for the proof.

Each campaign featured is illustrated with imagery showing the stages it went through in development – including sketches and early ideas that may have been abandoned, storyboards, animatics and photos from shoots, and shots of the final ads. Here are some spreads from the book to whet your appetite:

Cadbury's Eyebrows, by Fallon London

Carlton Draught Big Ad, by George Patterson Partners, Melbourne

HBO Voyeur, by BBDO New York

Honda Cog, by Wieden + Kennedy London

More info on the book is available on the LKP website, here.

CR subscribers should also check out an article from the March 2012 issue by Eliza, which lists ten top tips for making a great ad, compiled from the expert knowledge of the creatives she spoke to when researching the book. Read it here.

 

CR in Print

Thanks for visiting the CR website, but if you are not also reading CR in print you're missing out. Our March issue is an illustration special with features on Clifford Richards, Pick Me Up, the relationship between illustrators and writers, the making of the cover of the New York Times Magazine and a powerful essay by Lawrence Zeegen calling on illustrators to become more engaged with the wider world and accusing the profession of withdrawing "from the big debates of our society to focus on the chit-chat and tittle-tattle of inner-sanctum nothingness".

The best way to make sure you receive CR in print every month is to subscribe – you will also save money and receive our award-winning Monograph booklet every month. You can do so here.


How 30 Great Ads Were Made

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: Creative Review | Filed under: Advertising, Books | Comments Off

Published today by Laurence King Publishers is How 30 Great Ads Were Made: From Idea To Campaign, a new book by CR's Eliza Williams. The book takes readers behind the scenes of 30 of the last decade's most successful ad campaigns...

Featuring interviews with the key creatives, directors and clients for each campaign, the book offers an insight into how great ad campaigns get made, along with some surprising facts about some of the most popular ads of recent times: for example, did you know that the children's brows in the Cadbury's Eyebrows spot were manipulated by puppeteers rather than CGI? See the pic above for the proof.

Each campaign featured is illustrated with imagery showing the stages it went through in development – including sketches and early ideas that may have been abandoned, storyboards, animatics and photos from shoots, and shots of the final ads. Here are some spreads from the book to whet your appetite:

Cadbury's Eyebrows, by Fallon London

Carlton Draught Big Ad, by George Patterson Partners, Melbourne

HBO Voyeur, by BBDO New York

Honda Cog, by Wieden + Kennedy London

More info on the book is available on the LKP website, here.

CR subscribers should also check out an article from the March 2012 issue by Eliza, which lists ten top tips for making a great ad, compiled from the expert knowledge of the creatives she spoke to when researching the book. Read it here.

 

CR in Print

Thanks for visiting the CR website, but if you are not also reading CR in print you're missing out. Our March issue is an illustration special with features on Clifford Richards, Pick Me Up, the relationship between illustrators and writers, the making of the cover of the New York Times Magazine and a powerful essay by Lawrence Zeegen calling on illustrators to become more engaged with the wider world and accusing the profession of withdrawing "from the big debates of our society to focus on the chit-chat and tittle-tattle of inner-sanctum nothingness".

The best way to make sure you receive CR in print every month is to subscribe – you will also save money and receive our award-winning Monograph booklet every month. You can do so here.


What’s On: Eric Yahnker

Posted: March 5th, 2012 | Author: Alex Moshakis | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

Ey_small

Later this week, artist Eric Yahnker will show new work at New York’s Armory art fair. This isn’t news, per se, but it’s certainly notable given the excitement that sweeps through our studio whenever the one-time comedy writer reveals his latest drawings. At a time when ‘funny’ art is frequently dismissed as being un-serious, Yahnker provides welcome proof that humour and intelligence can mix to devastating effect. (Read more)

www.ericyahnker.com